On-board Mid-scoop/Notch Filter Parameters

Discussion in 'Pickups, Electronics & General Tech' started by ElRay, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. ElRay

    ElRay Mostly Harmless

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    I'm starting to plan-out an Ovation Breadwinner “Tribute” build. I’m not going to replicate the on-board electronics, but build a modernized version using contemporary components.

    Overall, it’s pretty straight-forward, but I’m not sure what the parameters on the mid-scoop/notch filter should be: center frequency, bandwidth & Q-factor. I’ve dug through all the Breadwinner fan pages I can find, but haven’t been able to find the specs.

    Also, since this is a “tribute” and not a reproduction, I’d like to pick parameters that are “contemporarily useful” vs just duplicating what was done. I remember some folks thinking the notch was too deep.

    That said, even if I get exact specs, I’ll still likely build the notch filter with trim pots so I can fine adjust the response.
     
  2. DudeManBrother

    DudeManBrother Hey...how did everybody get in my room?

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    I’d think something around 750 hz +/-12 dB would be most useful. As far as bandwidth/Q is concerned, I like the concept from empress; which utilizes a 3 position mini toggle for med-high-low Q.
     
  3. ElRay

    ElRay Mostly Harmless

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    Seeing the amount of variability in “the consensus” on scooped mids, I may have to go with a one-channel parametric filter and either have internal trim pots, or additional knobs on the top.
    Is that a pedal? Or an on-board effect?

    EDIT: Found it. My Google-Fu was off.
     
  4. DudeManBrother

    DudeManBrother Hey...how did everybody get in my room?

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    A full 200hz-2khz parametric sweep would be killer IMO.
     

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