Minimalistic drumkit

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by vansinn, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. vansinn

    vansinn ShredNeck into Beck

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    Just how small can a drumkit be and still be decently flexible for a variety of styles in rock, metal and progressive jazz-metal-fusion?
    I find it hard to imagine a kit with much less than bass drum, snare, kick, 2-3 toms, hi-hat and at least three cymbals.

    And yet, I see youtube vids where the drummer is using mostly bass drum, snare, kick, just one tom, hi-hat used as a dead cymbal and mostly two more cymbals; the rest only sees occasional use - however, it's this occasional use I'd be worried about not having.
    But it still makes me think such a compact kit, combined with a hex or octal electronic pad which could be programmed for a variety of things on a per-style usage, just might do the trick.

    BTW, are there any double-pedal electronic bass drums capable of emulating two different bass drums?
     
  2. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I think that's a pretty subjective topic.

    I don't know any drummers, personally, who are comfortable playing rock or metal on anything smaller than a five piece with a crash, ride, and hihat. Really, with modern metal, you might be better off with a china cymbal instead of a ride cymbal, if you had to choose only one.

    I've also suggested in the past that, for open mic night or such, a drummer try using a cocktail kit, like the Yamaha hipgig, or ?uestlove kit, etc., and been scoffed at profusely.

    But, on the other hand, Mike Portnoy can do drum clinics on a "Hello Kitty" drum set...?

    On the other other hand (foot?), I've seen drummers in folksier contexts use just a bass, snare, and crash/ride cymbal, and it worked.

    So, it's all about what sorts of tones you need to bring to the table. Honestly, with a 4-piece, you can do a fair variety of fills, and it should work okay. Two crashes are great, but one will sometimes do. The trouble is monotony. If you try to vary your fills, and you aren't super creative incorporating different things into fills, you will end up doing the same fills a lot more often without that extra tom, or without that extra crash cymbal, or whatever.
     
  3. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    I've always viewed the essentials as just being the bass drum, snare, and hats. Everything outside of that comes down to context. More toms means more varied and interesting fills. Same with cymbals. For metal, I'd feel pretty lost with no ride cymbal, but I could easily live without a china.

    I've recently pieced together a kit that I see as being pretty minimal while still being able to play "anything" in a rock/metal context - snare, kick, two rack toms, one floor, hats, ride, and two crashes. Basically, the standard "rock kit" setup, and I sometimes add a small china. If I needed to cut things down, I could live without one of the toms, and the second crash. Anything less than that I think you'd be pretty limited. I was without a ride cymbal for a few weeks and definitely sounded weird when I needed one but didn't have it.
     
  4. vansinn

    vansinn ShredNeck into Beck

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    Thanks for replies, guyz; pretty well matches my ideas.

    Anyways, I've found the solution to space requirements on drum kits ;)


    [youtubevid]fj5TZFHBn3o[/youtubevid]
     
  5. vansinn

    vansinn ShredNeck into Beck

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    @Admins: Sorry I missed that we actually have a drums board.
    Move it OVER there if you like ;)
     

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