Martial Arts

Discussion in 'Lifestyle, Health, Fitness & Food' started by theo, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. Evilized

    Evilized SS.org Irregular

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    I'm in the same boat, although for a different reason. Shortly after I received my 3rd degree black (in TKD as well), school was just becoming too busy. About midway through undergrad I had to stop altogether to focus on studying. Which is unfortunate, since I'm eligible to test for my 4th. Hoping to get back into it next year after I move to the states. I miss sparring!
     
  2. theo

    theo Got Hype(machine)?

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    Good luck evilized!
     
  3. jenagrey8585

    jenagrey8585 SS.org Regular

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    Every martial art will increase your coordination. Some more, and some less. Karate may not improve your coordination as much as Capoeira, but they both make you stronger and flexible in their own way. What’s important is that you pick something where you enjoy the trainer, the people and the art itself; otherwise you’ll end up quitting.
    One of the biggest benefits I’ve noticed from martial arts is the psychological part. When you start out, you’ll probably be scared of putting your heart into what you’re doing.
     
  4. zilla

    zilla Grand Poobah

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    Just found this thread.

    I've trained in a number of styles: Judo, Aikikai Aikido, and jiu jitsu: traditional Takenouchi-Ryu, Tenjin Shin'yo Ryu styles and modern Can-Ryu.

    Can-Ryu jiu jitsu is a style that incorporated a lot of western boxing. Very unique and effective style.

    The only "unfortunate" part was that a lot of the techniques could only be taken so far... you always had to hold back a bit otherwise there could be serious damage done.

    Judo was great in that you could go at 110% and still be "relatively" safe... also made me realize that most of the fancy joint locks are really just an academic exercise in biomechanics. it would be extremely unlikely that you would be able to apply kote gaeshi or similar on someone attacking at full strength (then again, some would say that if you are properly trained, you would never find yourself in a situation in which you would need to resort to physical techniques, but that's another debate.... :) :)

    I wish i could find a yosekan aikido or a yoshinkan aikido dojo around here. aikikai aikido was very good at honing ukemi and joint manipulation, but i wasn't able to keep doing only that.

    I had to take a break from training a few years ago due to some nagging injuries that needed time to heal. I'm really anxious to get back into it, but unfortunately in this town jiu jitsu = MMA and it's full of guys in their tap out shirts and rash guards who don't even know what a gi is.:rant:
     
  5. ZEBOV

    ZEBOV Banned

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    I think I want to learn Krav Maga. It's so simple yet super effective. Your thoughts?
     
  6. zilla

    zilla Grand Poobah

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    I'd like to try krav maga, too.

    From what I've seen, the concepts and principles are very similar to can ryu.
     
  7. theo

    theo Got Hype(machine)?

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    That really interests me, It's always bugged me that with Jiu Jitsu you can have a guy in a position where you could effectively deliver some devastating strikes etc but you aren't allowed to.

    My only experience with Krav Maga practitioners has been negative. The two guys I've met have been ridiculously arrogant about it. To the point where I was talking to one of them (I'd met him at a party and we got talking about martial arts) about techniques and I was curious about the style. His only reply was "I can't show you anything, all our moves are only designed to kill or seriously injure". Later that night he threatened me with a baseball bat. I'm glad I managed to keep my cool. That situation could easily have gotten ugly.
     
  8. capoeiraesp

    capoeiraesp Ormsby nutter

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    ^awesome, just plain awesome. This is my concern when you're dealing with self-defense forms that aren't grown from a martial arts perspective or set of principles. People get caught up in the offensive or aggressive nature of it because there's not an 'ethical' foundation like in traditional martial arts. FYI, I don't know a whole lot about the principles of Krav Maga so I could be completely wrong in my interpretation of one person's negative representation of the self-defense form.
     
  9. theo

    theo Got Hype(machine)?

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    Also, please don't take what I'm saying the wrong way at all. This is just my only experience with Krav Maga. I'm not putting it down or saying everyone who practices the form is like this.

    I saw the Krav Maga episode of fight quest (or was it human weapon? I can never distinguish the two) and the woman who trained them in that was a total beast.
     
  10. Floppystrings

    Floppystrings No like the floppy

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    I started with Tae Kwon Do when I was 11 years old.

    After going to one bad school, and leaving pretty fast I joined probably one of the best schools in Florida at the time. The classes were very militant, and tradition was pretty hardcore. The only tournaments we attended were international WTF (World TDK Federation) invite only events. It is the same organization that does the Olympics, there was a lot of pressure, our black belts won a LOT of tournaments.

    I went to my first tournament as a yellow belt green tip, so I think I had about a year and a half of training at the time, and came in second. It wasn't a very good experience because I got a knee injury (I was 12, and it sucked). Partially torn meniscus, not too serious, no surgery needed, but it kind of scared me. This was back in 1994 and if you tore an ACL you were shit outta luck.

    I eventually left the school when I was 13, I would go every day and often take double classes. I got to blue belt red tip, and seeing all of the pressure I was about to face, and not even having fun with it any more I decided to move on. The school also has some issues, which led to a lack of sparring, which is what I LOVED to do more than anything. And then there was the tournament exclusivity, which I guess means if you want to compete you are going to be flying around the world to do it.

    After that, I watched UFC (one) for the first time, I was 13 and thought it was crazy. I swore some guys died and they just edited it out of the footage. lol I learned that fighting on the ground is a very important element that I had no experience in. From that point on, I never looked at martial arts as "one" style. I was pretty bitter about dedicating myself to TKD like I did.

    Right after I left TKD I got in a fight near the end of middle school, it was kind of bad, I could have gotten sued (lots of knees to the head, almost knocked the kid out, he couldn't stand) I felt pretty horrible about it. There were two other cases in high school where I had to fight, and I would always use Judo and avoid striking completely. I stayed away from fights after that.

    Now I am 30, and recently got into really good shape, I started boxing and that opened the can of worms. I decided I was going to compete in featherweight MMA at 145, and have since met a lot of people but have not found a proper training location. I am done with gi's and belts, and at this point I prefer to train with other competing fighters only (they are the only ones that are willing to spar hard, where you learn the most about yourself).

    I was planning on having my first fight this year already, but the amount of bullshit I ran into left a lot to be desired (promoters lol). Training MMA is very expensive, it consumes your life 100% and you have no choice but to be completely dedicated. Lack of sparring partners is such a very real problem that you almost have to be lucky in finding proper training partners hours away.

    As of right now, I am taking a break from the whole mess. I do plan to continue training in a month or so, I am hoping to work with Richard Crunkilton who lives in the area (nice guy): Rich "Cleat" Crunkilton MMA Stats, Pictures, News, Videos, Biography - Sherdog.com

    I would never think of doing this if I didn't have a lot of confidence in my abilities, and after seeing what other 145ers have to offer, I am not impressed by their performance :D.
     
  11. theo

    theo Got Hype(machine)?

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    Maybe it's time to bulk up a bit and enter a heavier division then? Or just dominate the 145!
    Thanks for sharing floopystrings :)

    On the subject of sparring I had an excellent and very illuminating class that dealt exclusively with sparring last week. I think it's about time I tested out the tournament scene. Probably start just with forms/kata and point sparring though. I don't know where I'd stand in a continuous match.
     
  12. Floppystrings

    Floppystrings No like the floppy

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    I am definitely a 145er, I even tried to get down to 135 but I was very skinny and my cardio suffered.

    Sparring can be a lot of fun. I can bring people in to my local gym, but I am horrible at convincing people to spar with me. When I have a fight coming up I will probably spend hundreds on partners to come in, boxers, muay thai, kick boxers, BJJ rollers, wrestlers, other MMA guys etc. I probably won't find that variety but I hope so, I have pretty good connections.
     
  13. Fiction

    Fiction For Mod

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    I'm actually hoping on starting some form of martial art soon, but I honestly have no idea where to start to find what style I'm after. I'm ending my gym membership soon, as I'm not really after a huge build and I've gained what mass and strength I want from it, I've always preferred the aesthetics of more slimmer fighters/body weight training builds and in the end is my goal. I do some parkour and some yoga to atart/end the day at the moment ad am hoping to get right into that, but I also have an interest in learning some form of martial art.
     
  14. zilla

    zilla Grand Poobah

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    Krav Maga was born from the Israeli military for hand-to-hand combat.

    simple, brutal, and effective.

    It's not really about self defense... it's about self survival.
     
  15. zilla

    zilla Grand Poobah

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  16. capoeiraesp

    capoeiraesp Ormsby nutter

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    Zilla, you're spot on. I've known dudes from various professions who've trained it and it's always because of its effectiveness and relevance to their profession.
     
  17. All_¥our_Bass

    All_¥our_Bass Deathly Chuuni

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    Could anyone recommend some reliable books?

    I'm looking for something grab/grapple based. Like Judo.
     
  18. zilla

    zilla Grand Poobah

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    what kind of books? you want technique books or something else?

    there's Kodokan Judo by Jigoro Kano which is the bible for judo. It's not really a book that you sit down to read.. it's more of a reference book if you already know the techniques. Amazon.com: Kodokan Judo: The Essential Guide to Judo by Its Founder Jigoro Kano (9784770017994): Jigoro Kano: Books

    the entire Judo Masterclass series is excellent Amazon.com: judo masterclass: Books don't believe the prices on amazon. you can get them each for about $20 per copy... none of this $500+ nonsense.

    Gracie Jiu Jitsu by Helio Gracie is good. he does more than the typical MMA moves that you see in UFC fights... a lot of the fundamentals. Gracie Jiu-Jitsu: Helio Gracie: 9780975941119: Amazon.com: Books


    Judo Unleashed by neil Ohlenkamp is good too. very clear. i think neil also owns/runs judoforum.com Amazon.com: Judo Unleashed: Essential Throwing & Grappling Techniques for Intermediate to Advanced Martial Artists (9780071475341): Neil Ohlenkamp: Books
     
  19. skeels

    skeels ..to pay the beels

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    I love this thread!

    The story about jerky boy and his attitude about krav maga is classic.

    "I can't show you any moves. The only moves I have are designed to kill or seriously injure you."

    "That's okay. I practice a form that is specifically designed to make a highly dangerous person like you look like a loud mouthed idiot. This move is called 'take away your baseball bat and make you cry like a little girl and apologize'."

    I have seen it so many times. The big bad tough-guy dude keeps pushing the quiet dude until the quiet dude puts him in a thumb lock or something... :)


    EDIT: found this Bruce Lee bit from Art of the Soul. Reading the Tao of JKD actually made a bigger impact on my guitar playing than my "routines"..

    The artistic activity does not lie in art itself as such. It penetrates into a deeper world in which all art forms (of things inwardly experienced) flow together, and in which the harmony of soul and cosmos in the nothing has its outcome in reality.

    It is the artistic process, therefore, that is reality and reality is truth.
     
  20. All_¥our_Bass

    All_¥our_Bass Deathly Chuuni

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    Technique books, primarily.
     

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