Looking for a looper pedal and acoustic amp to do solo performances . Suggestions?

Discussion in 'Jazz, Acoustic, Classical & Fingerstyle' started by concertjunkie, Aug 21, 2016.

  1. concertjunkie

    concertjunkie SS.org Regular

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    I have never purchased an acoustic amp before, so I'm unsure what I should be looking for! Ideally nothing larger than a 2x12, preferably something smaller but still can be loud.
    I haven't played on a looper in a while, so I'm unsure if there are any advantages of one over another (Boomerang Vs. Digitech Jamman vs. Boss RC looper). Looking for something i could create a rhythm loop , play that over while I do another harmony/lead/etc. Maybe I'll expand into multiple layers too.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
     
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  2. Pooty Skills

    Pooty Skills Island Dweller

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    Despite having relatively few features, the TC ditto is my looper of choice. It's very intuitive, can do infinite layers of up to 5 minutes each (whole song loops) and really puts very few barriers between the guitarist and some super groovy jams. One of the best pedals I've bought, period.
     
  3. lucasroy37

    lucasroy37 SS.org Regular

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    Depends on what you're looking for in a looper and your budget. I have the RC-30 and it does a DECENT job is very hard to use live. Some downfalls I have found about the RC-30 is that there is no "Stop-All" or "Start-all" Pedal - you have to click twice to stop and then to get it to start at the same time you have all tracks stopped and change tracks quickly(hard to explain - watch my cover https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZ9gYXHL_qQ CLOSELY and you'll see the difficulty I am talking about). It is VERY hard to stop it exactly where you want it. It also doesn't have great effects. Other than that I have found that the RC-30 is pretty good in most circumstances.

    If you're looking for ease of performance and have a $500 ish budget - DEFINITELY get the RC-300. It has all of the features the RC-30 doesn't and more. I'm partially regretting buying the RC-30 cause the 300 is so badass.

    I only have experience with boss- but it's been a good one despite me not buying the 300. Hope this helps!
     
  4. Glosni

    Glosni SS.org Regular

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    In terms of amps, I bought a Kustom Sienna years ago and I am still perfectly happy with it. Definitely loud enough for bar-/church-/small club gigs.

    When it comes to looping, you can't really go wrong with either the Ditto by TC, which is also tiny, or the Ditto X2, which should run you 100 - 150 bucks. If you looking for an "all bells and whistles"-looper, try the strymon timeline, which has all the knobs and buttons in the world and usually sells for around 500.
     
  5. Barnaby

    Barnaby SS.org Regular

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    I loop a lot and have the Ditto, the Boss RC-20xl, the Boss RC-300 and the Nux Loop Core. I've also had the Vox Li'l Looper and have tried out a bunch of others.

    The Ditto is great fun, but it can be glitchy. I've not found it reliable enough for live playing, and other people I know say the same thing. The RC-20xl is great and intuitive, but has a large footprint and no good rhythm options. The RC-300 is awesome, but probably overkill for almost anyone, as well as being huge. Also, its onboard effects are horrible, so you need a separate pedalboard.

    The Nux Loop Core is a pretty cheap pedal that is, I believe, a copy of the Boss RC-3. It's perfect. The right size, consistently reliable, can be made much more versatile by the addition of a single or double footswitch (one switch is a dedicated stop/clear and the other toggles between saved phrases), has a small but decent selection of rhythms, and is really intuitive.

    I suspect I will never use the RC-20xl or Ditto again, as the Nux leaves them both in the dust. I should probably sell 'em both...although the RC-300 is worth keeping for its much greater versatility, plus things like MIDI capability so that it can sync loops with, for example, a Beatbuddy pedal.

    The only real downside of the Nux is in the tap tempo. There is no way to set a numerical value. Therefore, if you want to record, say, a second phrase in the same tempo as the first, you need to do it by feel. This can be hard to get exact, annoying in live playing and there's a lot of potential faffing about with switches. There are workarounds, but they're not simple. Still, it's a minor quibble.

    So that's my two cents...the Nux (or the RC-3).
     

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