Line 6 Relay G30

Discussion in 'Gear Reviews' started by leechmasterargentina, Jun 26, 2014.

  1. leechmasterargentina

    leechmasterargentina SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    29
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2012
    Location:
    San Juan, Argentina
    Story: I guess every guitar player has dreamed with a reliable wireless guitar system to use on stage, but heard horror stories of getting signal cuts and interference. Until last year, I can say I was happy with my 5/6 meter long guitar cables with Neutrik tips. It was normal to play on stage and getting my way out of the cables on stage, as well as not stepping them, coiling them in order not to misstreat them or stumble with them. But on my first gig of this year, I had enough. We played in this bar which had no stage; it's not nice (for a rock band) but it gave me the opportunity to come closer to the public, play with them and have fun. But even having such length, the cable would stick to the knobs or footswitches of my pod HD500. I had an important gig in a bigger stage coming and I needed a reliable wireless system soon.

    I had been suggested systems like Nady, but since I like looking for reviews on the gear I buy, I found many stories of getting signal drops, interference and tone loss. Even if Nady systems are cheaper than most guitar wireless systems, they are not cheap in my country, and systems like Line 6 or better cost more than twice.

    After reading lots of reviews, I got convinced by Line 6's Relay systems. Digital meant almost no tone loss, no radio interference, and realiability. I was aiming for a G50 system, but the only ones available in my country were the G30.

    The G30 is the cheapest of the Relay systems. I was worried of the distance, but believe me, 30 meters is more than enough unless you plan to perform in a stadium stage with a catwalk to the center, like AC/DC at River Stadium. Downsides seem more at first; besides having less distance than the rest of the systems, the transmitter is built of plastic and you have only 6 channels to work with compared with the 12 channels other models have. Even if it's made of plastic, you won't be hitting it while performing, but you have to be extra careful when you leave your guitar on the stand since the transmitter will likely hit the floor. Also, I found the channel quantity is not that important since this system works within Wi-Fi channels. At Line 6 webpage you will find which channels work in the 3 non-overlapping Wi-Fi channels, so that'll help you when choosing channels in a venue not to overlap with close Wi-Fi routers.

    The most obvious downside is the flimsy plastic battery door, which seems to struggle to stay in place when batteries are inserted. By searching in the web, I learned that some people had the battery door opened when performing, or the transmitter coming out from the guitar strap, to mention a few. I solved those by using rubber bands to secure the battery door as well as to secure the transmitter to the strap. Of course, I suggest that you check that the battery door is well closed before securing it with a rubber band. Also, I couldnĀ“t find wide rubber bands in my country (Crazy...) so I used 2 regular rubber bands for the battery door and 2 to secure the transmitter to the strap. I perform in a Metal band, it's important everything stays in place while I headbang, move or jump.

    First tests were at my band's rehearsal and this thing performed well. In my android phone I have a Wi-Fi scanner, so I used it before choosing the less congested channel and it worked like a charm. Also, you can use the receiver to "scan" for congested channels. With the transmitter off, change through the different channels and if you get many red lights that means those channels are congested.

    D-Day came. On stage, it performed excellent. It's easy to use; just plug and play. Not one drop I could notice. And it's like night and day to play with this in a decent stage. I could move around without worrying of a cable, and do whatever I pleased.

    Final comments are that you also have a cable simulator, but I didn't use it at all. Just sounds great this way. I also compared the sound with cable and with wireless. Honestly, I didn't feel there was tone loss at all, but maybe dynamics gets affected just a little, as well as volume, things which can't be noticed on stage I think.

    This is an excellent piece of gear. I haven't used it plenty, but I feel that as long as I take care of it, I can rely on it on stage. I also have read comments of people using it for recording guitars at the studio...I know there's hardly tone loss with this thing, but seriously, cable is the best thing and it's even more comfortable using a cable than using a guitar strap on studio to hold the transmitter. The receiver? it's just as small as an effect pedal and even lighter. No antennas, I just plugged and forgot about it.

    Here's a short video of that night's performance. Sound is bad, but you can notice the freedom I got with this thing:

     
  2. leechmasterargentina

    leechmasterargentina SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    29
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2012
    Location:
    San Juan, Argentina
    Here's another take from the same song, better sound quality though. Near the middle of the track, you can see the G30 transmitter in my back, both battery door and transmitter secured by crossing rubber bands.

     

Share This Page