Javier Reyes' YouTube video

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by linguos, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. linguos

    linguos SS.org Regular

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    So there's this video on YouTube:


    Here's playing some particular sort of jazz, and since I'm very new to jazz and have no clue how to learn about what he's doing I'm hoping someone here can help!

    BTW, I do know some of the straightforward theory bits like popular diatonic progressions using the standard ionian/aeolian. I know a bit about nondiatonic substitutions, normal things you can Google. That's just on paper though, my ear doesn't translate it that way yet. Anyways from the most basic, "it is this style of jazz", or, "listen to this artist because it's similar", or just straight up helping me on the theoretical approach.

    I'm really crossing my fingers on this one!! Hope y'all can help!
     
  2. linguos

    linguos SS.org Regular

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    BTW, as a side note, if anyone knows what guitar he's playing I'd like to know that as well. I'm digging on it pretty hard.
     
  3. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

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    Ask yourself an important question, what makes that jazz? I would personally, say nothing. It is just clean, chordy an melodic. The rhythms are pretty straight (not really swinging).

    Just pointing this out as you seem to be focussed on the 'it's jazz' part, more than anything mechanical or technical. As far as analysising the progression, my ear isn't quite up to the task, or more appropriately, I don't want to put in the time my less than spectacular ears would take to chunk at it.
     
  4. linguos

    linguos SS.org Regular

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    Well, I know it's not exactly like the jazz I normally hear, but I thought I was hearing extended chords and, although not strictly jazzy, non-conventional voicings, but that was sort of what I wanted to know, anything to indicate the style because I enjoyed it. There was definitely some sort of signature sound going on and I figured it was something chromatic or more likely involving borrowed/substituted chords which my ear is absolutely unsuited for.

    Anyways, I'm like a noob + 1 with this style. I get the theory and I've sat down long enough to memorize probably four or five common voicings for each maj7, min7, half diminished and dom7 chords. I'm starting to play around with tritone subs. Melodic minor harmony remains untouched. That's my resumee. That video is beyond me.
     
  5. Solodini

    Solodini MORE RESTS!

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    Learn to become familiar with the chord as their spellings, inversions, sounds and uses and it'll become easier. Chords are more than just shapes of the voicings. How would you be with building a cord in a different tuning?
     
  6. linguos

    linguos SS.org Regular

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    lol!

    Hey man, I do have traditional theory pretty much down!

    It's just if you take a jazzier approach to writing I'm lost on how to approach replicating the sound.

    "Common practice theory" so-to-speak tends to be very linear, it's pretty simple to figure out and replicate insofar as the person being replicated isn't some genius like Beethoven.

    Then there's jazzier/modern styles. I tend to think of them as the choosing of a chord which suggests a few different keys and whose intervals suggests one or a few potential functions. You may choose extra notes to colorize it, but the purpose is the function and it's all more about playing a scale, whether invented or conventional, to a chord rather than a set of chords to a scale, and finally letting those chords ride whims.

    Well, I currently suck at the whim part. I'm good with theory, I just need to know what my goal is. Plus, it's not usually that lax. There's usually some guidelines, it's not all whims, or it'd be more like Shostakovich or Stravinsky.

    At this point, even just saying "this fellow" sounds a lot like that tune by Reyes would help me. I'll play detective and dig my way deeper down the rabbit hole.

    EDIT: I must admit. I've been ravaging myself some Jody Fisher and Mark Levine and that video looks significantly less impressive than before. But I still want to know!
     
  7. 80H

    80H Banned

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    pretty sure the guitar is a Jesse Hall (Illustrated Luthier) custom. could be wrong but its very much his style
     
  8. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

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    To me it sounds like you are saying anything that is not a key, and sticking to a key entirely as a 'jazzier' idea. I think you should look into mediant relationships, which are a very classical idea.

    Even 'jazzy' ideas, as far as the standards go, are generally pretty simple. Lots of embellished chords, particular 7ths (they are the furniture for jazz), and the use of secondary dominants comes up a lot. These idaes aren't what makes the jazz though, they are ideas that were around for quite a while. The improvisation, interpretation of the tune, and swing, are what make the jazz, not the theory employed.

    If any of these terms are getting by you, let me know and I'll pop back and explain them to the best of my ability (albeit SW would do it 100X better, as would Solodini). Most of the jazz ideas are not just playing a contrived scale over a chord, as you seem to think. You idea about 'jazzy/modern' styles is a bit off the wall and highly rooted in chord scale theory but not much else. Most progressions in jazz are functional, heck most of the standards use a cycle of 5ths. Either way, you probably need to brush up on your 'traditional theory' if you think it is all 'very linear'.
     
  9. Mr. Big Noodles

    Mr. Big Noodles Theory God

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    A few observations:
    • Too much reverb.
    • Mostly triads. A respectable number of sevenths, rarely an extension.
    • Form is repeated binary. ABAB'
    • The music is decidedly in one key at a given time. Chromaticism and tonicization do not automatically result in modulation or harmonic ambiguity.
    • Where the fuck is the melody?! He relies too heavily on the chord changes.

    I don't like compartmentalizing music into genres, but this doesn't resemble the accepted iterations of jazz. There are some ideas that are stylistic of the blues (particularly in the B section), but I think it is better that you accept the music for what it is: solo guitar music.

    You might be drawn to the "jazz" definition because of Javier's use of fingerpicking and voice leading, but this is really just using the guitar as a polyphonic instrument. I hear a lot of common practice ideas, such as the V7 I cadence, and while that's common to a lot of styles of music (jazz included), the cadential pattern sounds very classical. If you want to be doing this sort of thing, I recommend taking classical guitar lessons or buying a classical guitar method book. One additional thought: the style reminds me of some of Steve Howe's work with Yes.

     
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  10. linguos

    linguos SS.org Regular

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    I know that chromaticisms don't modulate, I'm just saying I dig the colorization and at the same time it only serves to confuse me in figuring the music out. Personally I don't mind the chords and lack of melody in the parts you're refering to, it lends itself to a particular style, I figured he was doing something with spelling out a melody within those chord voicings, but I don't know.

    I think I keep refering to this being jazzy because the style is so new to me and it is precisely because I am so used to conventional metal or classical. Classical, especially "classical guitar" can really rely heavily on conventional triads, especially some Phrygian cadences. So many years I've been into learning some Tarrega, I've gotten the ear for it but never observed the theory. So that's my pickle. I'm only used to playing things mindlessly and am completely lost in jazz. This is because music hasn't always been the center of my attention, at the moment it is, and I'm trying to absorb everything I can.

    At the same time it's not entirely foreign, now that I think about it it reminds me a bit of Tommy Emmanuel. But again, I've never sat down and analyzed his music before, although I will now probably. I should also stress that this is entirely because I fully endeavor to be able to write as well, this is why I'm stressing the analysis part, to familiarize myself with these styles I've never dabbled in before.

    As an afterthought, I think this comes off as comping to me, which to my undeveloped ear always comes off as jazzy if too many sevenths or nonconventional chords are used, especially chromatic notes if done in some non-Chopin sort of way, more in a jazzy or blues way.

     
  11. fabriarockz

    fabriarockz Lefty! What the Fur?

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    Is there a Q-Tuner neck pu?
     
  12. javrey202

    javrey202 SS.org Regular

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    Hey this is Javier from AAL, check out a video of my teacher. His name is Julio Koko Sosa. I studied under him for several years and aquired a good amount of my technique from this man. Definitely worth taking a listen.

     
  13. VILARIKA

    VILARIKA SS.org Regular

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    I enjoyed that, his technique is so precise.
     
  14. Eptaceros

    Eptaceros Wayfarer

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    2nd half of that piece ruled
     
  15. AugmentedFourth

    AugmentedFourth X:1 K:C [c^f]|

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    Javier, you need to release a solo album.

    Like, as in, now.

    Like...

    ...now.

    But really, the video posted in the TS is amazing, I also particularly enjoyed the other vid on that same channel. Short 8 string piece. still in the works. - YouTube

    (P.S.: release a solo album, man)
     

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