Insane practice technique

Discussion in 'Jazz, Acoustic, Classical & Fingerstyle' started by ImBCRichBitch, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. Trespass

    Trespass AEADGBEA

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    I've been playing on my new archtop (NGD impending) with .013 gauge DR Sunbeams and high action. Because it's an archtop, I'm picking as physically as hard as I can (with a large acrylic 3mm pick) to get as much volume as possible. If you don't get a perfectly clean connection between string and fret at exactly the right time you're picking, you will not get a sound.

    My picking has never been in better shape.
     
  2. Fiction

    Fiction For Mod

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    I get as drunk as possible and try to play in a straight line.. Come sober time, boy oh boy can I play.
     
  3. iRaiseTheDead

    iRaiseTheDead Ashes Of Rebirth

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    ^ LOL

    And I'll have to try your fingerpicking technique!
     
  4. HOKENSTYFE

    HOKENSTYFE HeartWyrm

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    Yeah pretty much the same with me, just not the tab part. I play on an acoustic first, get some ideas, then translate to an electric. Acoustic(fender starcast) Electric(normally Ibanez ARZ8000/ then RGA8).

    Figure easier to buy a new acoustic than a new ARZ800. I love my Ibani!
     
  5. Moolaka

    Moolaka SS.org Regular

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    Going from fanned frets to normal is also pain in the neck for me, which is strange because I adjusted almost instantly to a multiscale. Doesn't seem to do much but balls everything up on both.
     
  6. Enselmis

    Enselmis SS.org Regular

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    I feel like playing on an acoustic doesn't really benefit you all that much. It may be slightly more difficult to push the strings down, but I don't feel like that really helps at all when going back to electric. I think there's a point pretty early on when gaining finger strength stops being an issue, about the time when you can comfortably play bar chords. Your goal should be to use as little pressure as humanly possible while still sounding the note properly. Practicing on an acoustic doesn't really help you work towards that, in my opinion.

    Edit: Not that I don't LOVE playing on an acoustic, I just don't think it's really a great practice tool.
     
  7. Trespass

    Trespass AEADGBEA

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    This is a bit presumptuous, but try playing a real acoustic. Not an acoustic made to play as close to an electric as they can within that body shape (Ibanez are really bad for that). You also have to pick like it's an acoustic (heavy right hand, large picks, striving for volume, projection, dynamics and balance).

    A Dreadnaught with .013s and high action will do wonders for your technique, hands down. The students I have that commit to this suggestion see jumps in their technique, all over the board.
     
  8. Adam Of Angels

    Adam Of Angels The GAS Man Contributor

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    Couldn't you do this on an Electric too?
     
  9. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

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    I just play bass, and do most of my legato practice on it to boot. Basses are more fun anyway, although I do find getting a good solid legato easier on them. Might have something to do with being a bassist though. Guitars, even acoustic, don't generally give me much trouble consequently. It has been years since I played much acoustic though, as I don't own one that is worthwhile.
     
  10. Enselmis

    Enselmis SS.org Regular

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    I own a Larrivee LV-09 with 12's on it, hardly an Ibanez! :lol:
     
  11. Trespass

    Trespass AEADGBEA

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    No.

    An acoustic, especially a dry acoustic, forces you to generate the volume and tone.


    Right, but how hard do you pick it? With what pick?
    How loud is the instrument? Have you considered raising the action to get more volume out of the instrument?

    If you play in an un-mic'd, acoustic ensemble, these questions become very important.

    If you can play cleanly and efficiently in that medium, the natural compression and volume of an electric instrument seems like cheating.
     
  12. Enselmis

    Enselmis SS.org Regular

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    I use pretty big ultex picks, not jazz picks. Regardless, I still don't think this really helps enough for it to be worth doing. I think finger strength beyond a certain point is a waste of time and energy and that your whole acoustic-with-high-action bit is beyond that point.

    Maybe it works for you and even some other people but I'm going to stick to using minimal force rather than crushing the strings and frets on my electric after working out on the acoustic.
     
  13. Trespass

    Trespass AEADGBEA

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    This can happen - I've had people overcompensate after committing to practicing on acoustic for a few weeks exclusively. But-

    The point is to develop pick control, dynamic range, the ability to accent etc.

    I have no problems with touch going to a scalloped neck with 9s, for example. I don't push myself out of tune.
     
  14. Adam Of Angels

    Adam Of Angels The GAS Man Contributor

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    This is still a matter of controlling your picking dynamics, and has nothing to do with acoustics unless you can't tell the difference without one.
     
  15. Trespass

    Trespass AEADGBEA

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    No, it's a matter of developing picking dynamics, dynamic range and picking control, and I'm advocating learning and practicing on an acoustic as an incredible tool to develop these skills. Which is what this thread is about. I am not saying you cannot develop these skills playing only electric, just that most of the time it's much more difficult to do so reliably.

    To a lesser degree, I'm also saying that there are things to be learned playing on an acoustic that cannot or are pointlessly difficult to learn on an electric, such as reliable volume/tone production, more refined control of dynamics than is needed in acoustic music etc.
     
  16. somniumaeternum

    somniumaeternum SS.org Regular

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    +1. I pick using different strenghts depeding on what sound I want, whether it's on an acoustic or electric it doesn't matter.
     
  17. Adam Of Angels

    Adam Of Angels The GAS Man Contributor

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    I don't know why this post started with "No", because you went on to say what I said, but then added that an Acoustic allows you to learn these skills where an electric will not. I practice almost exclusively on an unplugged electric, and I assure you that I've learned the same skills doing so. I'm not saying your technique is wrong or bad, I'm just saying that the same can be done on an electric.
     
  18. somniumaeternum

    somniumaeternum SS.org Regular

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    I think what your saying is "correct" in practice, but only because a lot of people don't put emphasis on dynamic picking on electric guitar instead of because of some innate fact that electrics are not as good to practice on.

    Just depends on how limited the playing is on electric. I play both and I've practiced on both.. and neither are better or worse for practice imo. Saying potentially practicing X is almost pointless on electric and you can learn it only on acoustic is pretty off the mark..
     
  19. Trespass

    Trespass AEADGBEA

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    Let me highlight:

    The "practice exclusively on an acoustic" is a method that will get you there much faster, with a much more reliable technique.

    I also added this in as an edit right after you quoted me. I did miss that clarification:
    I don't see anybody in the electric guitar world except certain blues players and Guthrie Govan who play with a large and expressive dynamic range.

    Not pointless, pointlessly difficult. When you're playing an electric guitar, you are fighting against so many factors that produce an unreliable response: Pickup compression, amp compression, volume - And this is before we add in any effects/processing to the signal.

    Thin strings (anything below 11s, for example) don't have a very large dynamic range.
     
  20. somniumaeternum

    somniumaeternum SS.org Regular

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    You're kidding right? Maybe volume differences aren't as present (because of stylistic elements) but attack and feel stemming from dynamic modulations are readily present.

    Govan, Gilbert, Di Meola, Satriani, Lane, MacAlpine, Gambale, hell even Yngwie has this.

    Again... what?

    Honestly, this just sounds like you're pretty ignorant about details in electric guitar playing and are stuck on some old misconceptions.
     

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