I want to explore the American wilderness, where do I start?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by will_shred, Nov 3, 2017.

  1. will_shred

    will_shred not that good.

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    Lately I've had a growing desire to go see the country, the real country. Places where we can get relatively far out from civilization, go camping (real camping, not some campground with a swimming pool and bar that costs $50 a night), do some serious hiking, canoeing, offroading, and general sight seeing. In my homestate of NY there are, as far as I can tell, no places where you can just go explore nature. Its always lodges, motels, campgrounds, whatever. That to me just seems completely inauthentic, and I won't settle for it. Plus our states geography is really boring outside the Adirondack mountains, which brings me back to my previous point about lodges motels and camp grounds. Are there are places left where you can just go, and ACTUALLY get away from it all?
     
  2. JSanta

    JSanta SS.org Regular

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    We live in the same city - but it sounds like you haven't actually been to the Adirondacks yet. If you want to get away from people, you can do it there.
     
  3. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Cross the boarder into Vermont. :lol: Seriously, there are tons of places with no people here, especially around the Northeast Kingdom. Then, you're just a skip and a jump to the White Mountains, in case you really want to punish yourself.
     
  4. High Plains Drifter

    High Plains Drifter SS.org Regular

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    Big Bend in far south-west Texas... 800,000 acres of very primitive wilderness. An incredible experience if you keep to the back-country.
     
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  5. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I've made it to Rochester and back in a day, so it should be a half day's drive for you to get here.

    [​IMG]
    ^ That's right where I live.

    From wikipedia:
    As of 1997, 80% of the Northeast Kingdom was covered by forest;[5] 59% was northern hardwood, 29% spruce or fir.

    The Northeast Kingdom has been listed in the North American and international editions of 1,000 Places to See Before You Die, the New York Times best-selling book by Patricia Schultz. In 2006, the National Geographic Society named the Northeast Kingdom as the most desirable place to visit in the country and the ninth most desirable place to visit in the world.[6]

    The largest municipalities in the Northeast Kingdom are the towns of St. Johnsbury (population 7,603), Lyndon (5,981), and Derby (4,621), and the city of Newport (4,589)

    But check out Essex County. The biggest town in the entire county has a population of 1300. Basically, before you explore, you will want to make sure you have a full tank of petrol, a spare tyre, a jack, a tent, some calorie-dense foods like granola, plenty of water, etc. There are plenty of hills and forests and rivers and ponds to explore there. If you get lost in northern Essex county, there's a chance you might end up in Canada without even knowing it. You won't find a damned hotel anywhere in Essex county, the nearest one would be in St. Johnsbury, near the edge of neighbouring Caledonia county.

    Others might say that northern Maine and NH are more remote, but it's really just all part of the same swath of nothingness across extreme northern New England, which collectively is objectively the most remote region of the USA east of the Mississippi River. Since you are basically right next door, I'm not sure how you don't already know this place exists, except for the fact that there's damn near nothing here, so why would anyone at all know this place exists?!

    We even have "gores." What's a gore, you ask? It's an area of land where no person, organization, nor local government stakes any claim. So, where most land area is claimed by a town or a township or as a state park or something, no one even gives enough of a shit about a gore to even utter the phrase "this place is mine." No one wants a gore, because the area around the gore is already claimed by towns with zero population, and those zero population townships are not absorbed into neighbouring townships because those have populations like Avery: 24, or Ferdinand: 32, or Victory: 62...etc. It's so remote that no one cares at all about that place. If you go there, you would be the first person to even grace such a place with human presence for years, maybe longer. You could go there and make your home there. But you wouldn't want to, because you'd have to build a road to get there, or else spend more than a day hiking there, which means grocery shopping would be impossible, and if you needed a new appliance or some fuel or water or something, well, you'd have to find it or make it yourself. You might as well be in Northern Canada.
     
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  6. will_shred

    will_shred not that good.

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    that is fucking SICK.

    Thanks guys! Keep the suggestions coming. I mean, I knew these places were out there, but I couldn't find them just by googling "Camping NY", and that's kind of the entire point.
     
  7. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    Yeah, given where you are, I'd suggest getting up into the Adirondacks, at least to start. It's gorgeous country up there. Northern Vermont and Northern Maine are way off the beaten path, too, in one direction, and in the other northern Michigan was gorgeous. I didn't make it into the UP, but even Bear's Dunes National Park, while not super isolated, is amazing.

    Other than that, from where you are, I don't know if I'd be looking east or west so much as north - you're close to the Canadian border, and basically all of the Canadian population is right on the border. Cross over either at Niagara or north of Syracuse and head north, and I don't know the area at all but I'm SURE you'll be somewhere pretty desolate within a couple hours.

    Finally, a long drive from where you are, but my little sister lived in Salt Lake City for a number of years, and I have a huge soft spot for the Wasatch range. Lower Red Pine Lake in Little Cottonwood Canyon is one of the most beautiful places I've ever been, and Upper Red Pine Lake was the first time I've ever had the feeling of walking somewhere where you can just feel not all that many people have been before you. I think it was the first time I'd ever broken 10,000 feet on a hike (from a start of mayube 5k), so I think the altitude was impacting my judgement a little, but it was like walking on a different planet. If I'd had more time I might have tried to get up on the ridgeline of peaks above it.
     
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  8. thraxil

    thraxil cylon

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    I grew up in northern Maine. Can confirm that there's plenty of remote areas. My parents were hippies in the 60's and moved out to the middle of nowhere, built a log cabin, dug a well, and lived there subsistence farming until the early 80's (when my sister and I had to go to school or be considered truant--the homeschooling movement hadn't really gotten popular yet and they couldn't afford a lawyer). Our nearest neighbors were a couple miles away and our "driveway" was only passable with a snowmobile in the winter and was flooded out for weeks at a time in the spring.

    I can also highly recommend Montana, Wyoming, and that general area in the Rockies. Not hard at all to get away from people out there and it is spectacularly beautiful. My best hiking experiences in the US have mostly been out there.

    I'm not a big fan of the desert personally (don't like heat), but western Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona also offer plenty of isolation.
     
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  9. crg123

    crg123 SS.orgLocalArchitect

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  10. BlackMastodon

    BlackMastodon \m/ (゚Д゚) \m/ Contributor

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    I only drove through it, but Pennsylvania was absolutely beautiful with all of the mountains everywhere. I don't know of any good national parks/reserves there but could be a nice place to check out.

    Bostjann's town looks gotdang beautiful, too!

    This past fall I did a trip through the Canadian Rockies into Vancouver, so closest part of the US to that area is Montana and northern Washington state.
     
  11. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire 8 string hoarder

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    Boundary Waters Canoe Area, certain parts of glacier/yellowstone park, there's tons of wilderness in Montana/North Dakota/Utah, etc. I've gone days without running into people in the rockies, same with the longer trails in glacier where you can only backpack in. Boundary waters is probably the best example in my mind, you won't see another soul other than at the parking lot loading/offloading their gear (provided you don't stay at some super close portage and are willing to trek a bit further). I was in Montana fly fishing/skiing a couple of years ago and the only time I ran into people was when I drove through a town of about 20 people (this was way up in the mountains).
     
  12. cwhitey2

    cwhitey2 BlackendCrust Metal™

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    NY has shit loads of places where there are no people and places to hike :lol: go to the Adirondacks :coffee:
     

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