How to deal with stress and pressure from work?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by vejichan, Apr 8, 2017.

  1. vejichan

    vejichan SS.org Regular

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    1) demanding managers and supervisers
    2) last minute deadlines
    3) constant emails and paperwork
    4) critical coworkers talking about how bad your performance is
    5) etc

    Basically constant work ontop of work with demands and tons of to do list..that feels like you can't finish and end up staying late at work. Any suggestions how to deal with this and how to better organize and perform better?
     
  2. High Plains Drifter

    High Plains Drifter SS.org Regular

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    Prioritize tasks, communicate concerns, and don't take the stress with you when you leave.

    You can't do much to change "workplace gossip" nor people generally talking crap about you. In a specific instance, you may find that going to a supervisor is what is necessary, but there's not much that you can actually do to "change" people's views, attitudes, etc. Some people may respect and/ or like you.. others maybe not so much. You have to accept that people talk crap and above all else do NOT take it personally. If it is a supervisor, that may warrant a different approach but as far as fellow employees... there's always going to be some drama or crap-talking. Just how it is.

    If other employees are making it difficult for you to get things done, then you might possibly need to communicate those concerns with your superiors. But you should also keep in mind that those superiors already have a good deal of things on their plate as well. Essentially... pick your battles and know that every issue that you may have, may not necessarily be a legitimate issue in their eyes. Again... sometimes you just need to suck it up.

    Not everything that is supposed to be done is going to get done if there are a great deal of variables... customer issues, being short staffed, a task that happens to take longer than projected, other tasks being added to the list, etc, etc. You have got to always keep in mind that you are only human and you can only take on so much before feeling overwhelmed. Communicate with your superiors when/ if you feel that too much responsibility is resting on your shoulders. Maybe they can help you if they feel as though your concerns are warranted and if they feel that you are a valuable employee.

    A workplace should not cater to every concern and/ or request as it relates to every single employee. It is after all, a business and sometimes things are tough and sometimes unfair. That being said, there are certain aspects of a job that should not be ignored. If you are an employee, you deserve to work in an environment that is not hostile, nor demotivating, nor demoralizing. If things are happening at your job... things that leave you feeling unappreciated, belittled, confused, etc... then you really do owe it to yourself and to the company, to be transparent about those concerns and again... communicate with your superiors.

    At the end of the day... again: You are only human and you are only one person. There are plenty of ways to unwind and to rejuvenate after a tough day but you have to decide how it's best to let things go and how to handle an issue that you simply cannot let go. Please... do not allow workplace issues to consume you. No business is worth that with the exception of maybe a business that you actually own.
     
  3. vejichan

    vejichan SS.org Regular

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    Thanks. I wasliterally overwhelmewWrk...basically9am to 10pm and didn't even eatlunch. F thiskeeps up I might not lastlong at thisjb.

     
  4. cwhitey2

    cwhitey2 BlackendCrust Metalâ„¢

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    I was recently in the same situation you are.

    My manager sent me to a professional development class for being overwhelmed and let me tell you, it was totally worth it.

    What i got out of it was i don't delegate enough of the non priority work i have. I'm a 'team leader' at my job so i can do some delegating, not everyone always had that option. I only work on major projects now vs trying to do everything.

    Not all work is important. You need to decide what is important to you and the customer; important to the customer but not you; important to you but not the customer; and lastly what's really not important at all.

    Check out books from Stephen Covey, specifically 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. You will not finish this book and probably won't like it, but the info in it is awesome.



    Do not multitask. Period. I used to try and do 20 things at once. I do no more then 2 things at a time now and there isn't really any stress since i have been doing​ more delegating. I still help people with those projects if they need it, but i won't do the job for them. Which is good, because it's essentially giving them training, experience and confidence.

    I purged all my paper work that wasn't recently used. I emptied my desk.

    My co lead is out right now so i have twice the work i had when i was overwhelmed​. I'm not stressed at right now because because I'm prioritizing and delegating.




    Don't bring work home when you can.


    Get more hobbies, do something that have been wanting to do forever, but for whatever you have never done. It will clear your mind or at least take your mind off the stress.



    That's all i have for advice :lol:
     
  5. Demiurge

    Demiurge Intrepid Jackass

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    It's hard to tell from this if most of these are just challenges that come with the type of work that can be remedied by better desk management versus sign of a crummy workplace.

    1) Having a demanding manager is normal, but a manager who communicates poorly, sets unreasonable expectations, and fails to secure the tools their direct reports need to succeed is not normal.
    2) Last minute deadlines are normal (because sh*t happens, right?), but having them often due to an ill-defined workflow or poor communication is not.
    3) Constant emails and paperwork are normal... and if they're not constant then call IT. :lol:
    4) A$$holes are everywhere. People who talk sh*t like that who are themselves proficient, caught-up on their own work, or assets to the company are rarer than goddamned Sasquatch. The degree that these people have authority, influence, or carte blanche is the variable.
     
  6. BrutalExorcist

    BrutalExorcist Chronic Chugger

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    This, pretty much. You might have ended up in a terrible situation, in which case, resign, dust your pants off, and move on. Your life's worth more than Mr. Barry Bi. G. DumBass Esq's 52nd yacht.

    ===============

    A couple resources that might help:
    -Liz Ryan, Human Workplace: can't tell you about her for-money products, but her advice columns and blogs have helped me immensely. Summary: stop acting like a disposable commodity if you want to stop being a disposable commodity.
    -"The Secret to Sell Anything", Harry Browne: not just a sales book, but an actual book on business, human communication, and discovering value. According to the preface, Mr. Browne discovered a way to make an unusually good income often working only 15-20 hours a week, no pushiness, no lying, no hyper-extroversion, no corporate backstabbing, et cetera.

    Those two resources should get you started in making "work" work harder for you.
     
  7. astrocreep

    astrocreep SS.org Regular

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    Getting Things Done (GTD) is fairly useful.
     
  8. Sumsar

    Sumsar SS.org Regular

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    I guess this depends much on who you are and what you do and probably also what your manager is like, but learning to say 'no' is a big thing. It might seem frightening at first to tell your boss that 'that's unrealistic, you have to talk to business and postpone this or remove things from scope', but my experience is that actually having the balls to say it gives you a lot more respect than trying to do more than you can (usually with poor results). I have only been in a real job for 8 months after University as a bi-consultant, so take it for what it is worth.
     
  9. Nick Finn

    Nick Finn SS.org Regular

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    Difficult question. I quit a job where I felt too much pressure. I just can't handle it. Now I am in absolutely different sphere, have less responsibilities, love my job, co-workers, but for all that my salary is 20 % lower than before.
     
  10. domsch1988

    domsch1988 SS.org Regular

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    One of my coworkers went ill two weeks ago and won't be coming back for months because of burn-out. This "We need to work 110% all day every day 11 hours a day" mentality needs to stop NOW.

    Things i've changed/done to calm down at work:
    - No emails after work. No calls, no sms no nothing. As soon as i leave the building i'm out.
    - I don't care what my boss thinks. I'm coming 5 minutes early to work and leave a bit after my shift finishes. Working longer is only an option if it's announced before hand or (i'm in the IT) a customers Server Room is burning and no other colleague is available.
    - I take my 30 minutes of break a day. I eat something, get into a space without co workers and listen to some music for 30 minutes. There are rare occasions of important customers that may interupt this time. Happend once in the past 12 months...
    - I stopped talking/thinking about work after work. My Girlfriend and I now have a ritual. When we come home from work, either one has 15-20 minutest to tell the other one about their work day. After that, work is done. This helps not getting caught up in thinking about work in your freetime.

    Basically, work as much as you can justify. If the company you work for thinks this isn't enough, leave. It's not worth it to risk your health for a company. No matter the money they pay you!
     
  11. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Learn how and when to politely say "no." (Obviously not by just saying the word "no.")
     

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