Help with doing industrial Drum Beats

Discussion in 'Drums & Percussion' started by Korbain, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. Korbain

    Korbain Stay negative!

    Messages:
    2,544
    Likes Received:
    85
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Looking at experimenting with some industrial rock/metal, any tips on making some good beats? what effects, timings, etc.

    I've tried it a few times and i can't get anything that works/sounds good lol. Have no problem making normal drumming patterns with a real sounding kit for my music, just can't seem to get the whole industrial thing going.
     
  2. Winspear

    Winspear Tom Winspear Vendor

    Messages:
    10,536
    Likes Received:
    1,168
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Location:
    Southend-on-Sea, Essex, U.K
    I don't listen to industrial at all so take this with a pinch of salt, but bits I have heard here and there seem to use pretty standard beats, just defined by the sound.
    I'd try distortion on the kick and snare for sure. Some 'metallic' sounding snares like Slipknot and St Anger come to mind. Trash kit pieces..some electronic dance samples etc.
    Also try the dance technique of sidechaining a sine wave to the kick for more low end. (Constant sine wave throughout the project, tune it to the track in the lowest audible octave - put a noisegate on it sidechain triggered by the kick drum).
     
    Korbain likes this.
  3. ZEBOV

    ZEBOV Banned

    Messages:
    2,562
    Likes Received:
    288
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2010
    Location:
    Suburbs of Memphis, TN
    Something I've noticed about industrial rock/metal is that a lot of times (but not always) is that industrial songs don't have to have the industrial-ness for them to be songs. However, the songs could be too simple, so to speak, especially if it's like Gravity Kills. Try writing the very basics: guitars, bass, and drums. Then try putting the industrial-ness in it.
    Let your inspirations for sounds come from everywhere. One thing that has stuck out in my mind for over 10 years is the tornado sirens around here. They're all at different pitches and they spin around kind of slowly, so I hear a higher pitched siren (B) fade in, and as it's fading out, a lower pitched siren (G#) starts fading in, and after it fades back out, I can faintly hear them while they're not pointed in my direction, and several seconds later, repeat.
     
    Korbain likes this.
  4. Korbain

    Korbain Stay negative!

    Messages:
    2,544
    Likes Received:
    85
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    thanks guys, i might write my next song by starting of with just bass guitar n drums, then add a bit of industrial pinch to the beats n layer it out with the old faithful electric guitar. Gonna spice my next song up, i always write electric guitar first, drums then bass last, gonna reverse it this time and try make it industrial :hbang:
     
  5. toiletstand

    toiletstand /\'...'/\

    Messages:
    2,180
    Likes Received:
    165
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Location:
    El Paso, Tx
    its very percussive emphasize on big simple beats
     
  6. Korbain

    Korbain Stay negative!

    Messages:
    2,544
    Likes Received:
    85
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    yeah i always noticed it's not overly complicated, but very full and in your face. I notice a bit of layering in the drums too for some industrial music, might give that a shot.
     
  7. Wings of Obsidian

    Wings of Obsidian Banned

    Messages:
    2,325
    Likes Received:
    84
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    It appears hat I have found this thread a little too late. I am making industrial metal right now. Really, I just tuned my snare head on my programming software to give a "metallic" bang and I added a nice accent to the bass drums every few beats to give it that "energetic" feel. Here is a tip: combine actual drums with electronic-techno drums. Have both going at the same time for complex beat patterns, then switch them off for like breakdowns or interludes.
     
  8. oddcam

    oddcam SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    May 12, 2011
    Location:
    Chicago
    Industrial metal drumming can be a lot of things, but there are a few elements that are textbook of the genre:

    - 16th notes on the hi-hat (or with studio effects)
    - Open hi-hat or other accent on the offbeat eighth notes.
    - Medium or fast tempo, with snare on 2 and 4.
    - Base drum on all four quarter notes, or on 1 and 3.

    Industrial metal pretty much requires that you use at least one of these elements. It is partially derived from dance/techno music, which is where those drum patterns originated.
     
  9. Sy01

    Sy01 Behold my >8C

    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    Industrial music is a thing that has stuck with me throughout my early years, and it's influenced a lot of the stuff I do. I don't particularly listen to a whole lot of industrial music, but I enjoy a few video games that have used industrial music in their soundtracks. The most notable game series is Command & Conquer, which combined stuff like Ministry and NIN with funk and a whole plethora of other styles.

    One thing that all industrial music has in common is the focus on percussion.

    Industrial percussion is usually enormous; really huge-sounding. I know it's probably not where the name comes from, but I often do go for a sound that reminds me of a factory or machinery. I normally use drum loops or other recordings; perhaps lo-fi stuff from vinyls or old tapes. You could also use random sounds other than drums. Be creative!

    Anyway, I normally cut up the samples and rearrange the beats to suit what I need; then push the whole lot through a guitar amp simulator. Have a play around with different impulse responses; amp cabs, mics, whatever; then tweak the EQ and distortion to make it sound really heavy. It's important to have really heavily accented beats, in my opinion. Make every beat count; especially the kick and the snare.

    Seriously, embiggen that shit son! :D

    Here's a track I've been working on for a project. It's not entirely finished yet, but I'm happy with it so far. It's not got any guitars in it, so it's not like industrial rock or metal. It's more like industrial electro or something; a few synths with distortion and such. It's got a bit of a breakbeat feel to it here and there, too. The hi-hat sound is actually a copy of the original beat I used, pre-FX, doubled in tempo, then hi-pass filtered to keep everything above 1 or 2KHz.

    To show how the drums sound on their own, here's a track made from a few short snippets.
     

Share This Page