Guitarists mostly sound the same now?

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by eightsixboy, Feb 28, 2018.

  1. eightsixboy

    eightsixboy あなたのお母さんを犯さ

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    So this is just how I've been feeling about a lot of the current online guitarists, don't get me wrong, I'm not saying anyone is bad/crap, I mean I'm one of these kinds of players as well :)

    It just seems whenever I see someone making a solo album or a band releases an album/song they almost all sound the same generic Plini/Polyphia progy djent thing. Besides some of the older most notable current players like Rick Graham, Martin Miller, Andy James, Angel Vivaldi etc no one seems to really stand out now, like they all watched the same star licks videos or something.

    I used to get excited about seeing all these new guitarists coming out with songs or YT vids maybe 4-5 years ago, but now it is almost like everyone is a 0-0-0-0 "insert random tap lick" 0-0-0-0-0-0 whilst using a fret wrap kind of player.

    I grew up listening to players who all had their own style like Greg Howe,Vinnie Moore, Malmsteen, Batio etc, even when you had clones they at least had something unique as well, someone like a Chris Impellitteri etc.

    This has me wondering, is guitar, or I should say instrumental guitar, becoming stagnant?
     
  2. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I like to think my stuff is totally different. But here's the thing - most people don't like "totally different" unless it's really really good. :lol:

    What's out there is way beyond just what's popular. And if what's popular all sounds the same, it's because something was good and then everyone tried to jump on the bandwagon. It happens a lot. When Creed got popular, they were pretty unique-sounding, but then, something like two years later, there were a billion bands that sounded like them. Going back a little further in time, remember the waves of late British heavy metal, early British heavy metal, ska, 70's punk, new wave, etc. etc....? It's a trend. The fact that a lot of people are now complaining about the trend means that the trend is nearing its end, but we already have tons of threads about "what's next" in metal. Sadly, it looks like metal is going into a sort of dormant state, though.
     
  3. MaxOfMetal

    MaxOfMetal Likes trem wankery. Super Moderator

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    Anyone can be technically proficient, it's a lot harder to write compelling music, especially technical and compelling music.

    With social media we now have access to more guitarists, but that doesn't exactly translate into more noteworthy guitarists.
     
  4. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    I think I've made similar observations before, then I'll run into something new and cool and exciting and forget all about all the samey-sounding stuff I had complained about. There's probably something to be said about an observable trend in what online-youtube-bedoom-etc players sound like, but it makes sense to me that players within certain communities would influence eachother.
     
  5. jwade

    jwade Doooooooooom

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    Easier access to recording platforms coupled with significantly easier social media usage for spreading material is definitely resulting in people posting a lot of 'I just learned this technique by popular guitarist X' stuff. It definitely seems like musical development has taken a back seat to people trying to be noticed for doing what's popular/already saturated.
     
  6. wannabguitarist

    wannabguitarist Contributor

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    I think we're just more aware of all the clones nowadays because of the internet and social media.
     
  7. bhakan

    bhakan SS.org Regular

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    I feel like we just reached a point of saturation with shreddy instrumental guitar like we did at the end of the 80s. In another decade it will have another resurgence when this wave isn't such a recent memory and the music scene has changed enough to provide a new take on the sound.

    I definitely agree about the internet muddying the waters, but that was equally true 5 years ago yet we still had people like Tosin and Plini. I think there's just gonna be a lull in shred for a little bit.
     
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  8. Descent

    Descent SS.org Regular

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    Yep...that's how they sound to me as well.
    Even our own Rusty Cooley has jumped on the djent wagon and releases bland chugs interspersed with the occasional "betcha can't play this” lick.
     
  9. ArtDecade

    ArtDecade John Bohlinger's Dank Stash

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    I wish more guitarists sounded like Mike Keneally and Guthrie Govan.
     
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  10. Vyn

    Vyn Not a Sparkly Vampire Contributor

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    Not to mention a lot of the tones that are being heard these days are either the same JP AxeFx patch or a 5150 clone with a drive pedal in front. -flame shield-

    Give it another few years and shred will be back I think. Everything else from the 80s has been seeing a resurgence.
     
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  11. Opion

    Opion Sir Mattafer

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    Just listen to Julian Lage every once in a while to cleanse your ears from all the nauseating repetitiveness coming from the prog metal genre today.

    In all seriousness, I kind of fell off that wave recently and only listen to a select few here and there. It took me til now to finally come around on Polyphia, and I don't even really like most of their stuff or the vibe they're going for but they're insanely talented. I do think social media has been making it harder to find noteworthy examples of great music in that genre. But I've been stepping more into the Jazz realm lately and there's tons of great players out there with their own voice, like Janek Gwizdala and Bob Reynolds (bass player and sax player respectively) who post super insightful vlogs on youtube weekly.

    Basically, listen to jazz. :lol:
     
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  12. ArtDecade

    ArtDecade John Bohlinger's Dank Stash

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    Jazz smells funny, but that Lage is a heck of a player.
     
  13. Eptaceros

    Eptaceros Wayfarer Contributor

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    +1 for Lage, talk about frightening mastery of guitar.

    While it is true that almost everything that you come across online can feel like a recycling of the most recent fad, keep in mind that your personal preferences are always recorded and fed right back to you. Add to that the fact that all fads become viral and you have even more of a feedback loop of regurgitation. All you gotta do is broaden your social horizons and I guarantee you'll find guitar playing that is completely unrelated to everything you're seeing and hearing.

    You don't even have to stray from metal! Check out this "tournament" on Toilet ov Hell that showcases innovative and under-exposed guitarists of our times.

    http://www.toiletovhell.com/the-mos...in-metal-right-now-tournament-quarter-finals/
     
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  14. mikah912

    mikah912 SS.org Regular

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    I feel the same way about a good majority of the guitarists out there, but there are exceptions:

    • Emil Werstler - Unlike that instrumental shred album he made with Eyal Levi, his new stuff eschews metal and goes for a cool-ass fusion of spaghetti western, gypsy jazz, industrial, trap and classical (it sounds better than that reads)
    • Nicholas Llerandi - Whether with Ever Forthright (prog metal), Stimpy Lockjaw (jazz fusion) or his own solo stuff (kinda Jimmy Herring-ish), he stands alone with with chromatic, jazzy runs and restrained tastefulness.
    • Max Phelps/Matthew Rossa of Exist - Also jazz-based metal guys, but they both smoke live and in the studio. Also, chromatic, but perhaps more lyrical than Nicholas LLerandi
    • Wes Hauch - I shouldn't have to say more, really.....
    • Josh Middleton - One of the few modern metal guys playing 6-string standard E, but not just rehashing 80s and 90s riffs.
     
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  15. BornToLooze

    BornToLooze SS.org Regular

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    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Andrew Lloyd Webber

    Andrew Lloyd Webber Super Duper Moduraturr

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    I’m just bombastically +1ing sentiments already expressed, but that’s what this site is for anyway:

    The electric guitar has been the symbol of mediocrity for ever, and the symbol of corporate america since 1965. Everyone has always aspired to sound like everybody else. But very few achieve even that level of mediocrity - The guitar-wearer’s days typically dwindle while sitting on the edge of a bed, growing intoxicated with daydreams of potential they’ll never make concerted efforts to realize.

    And Youtube is there to ensure they’re never confronted with running out of fantasies to mull over in the eternal space that precedes realizing them. The constant advent of technology is there to offer the undisciplined the means (and outsourced train of thought) to buy their way out of how they sound and register a Facebook, LinkedIn, Grindr, and Bandcamp for products and enterprises that don’t exist beyond their vaguest of ambitions. By sublimating efforts toward an actual end into uploading the documented going-through of these motions for posterity on Youtube, the undisciplined are allotted a vague sense of legitimization that transubstantiates their nothing to the Upgraded status of “unprincipled.”

    This Build-It-and-They-Will-Come approach to self-promotion is what social media and preset-sharing allow the unprincipled to indulge in as an alternative to any endeavor reeking of discipline. And, of course, it is not necessary to actually have a product to promote. I’ve seen local bands, having never performed live, try to crowdfund a debut EP. One closed with four anonymous $10 donations (by sheer coincidence, there were four band members trying to get the Giving spirit rolling).

    GuitarBizarre recently described this in a fun way that I’ll butcher: Bands couched in the Build-It-and-They-Will-Come mentality tend to list three band “influences” on their pages, then upload recordings that sound like a cover band playing song sections in the wrong order. Copy-and-paste derivation is the norm for those of the current century, entitled to instant gratification in the celebration of their own Artistry.

    And that ties right in with the Axe FX being ubiquitous to every bedroom studio but your grandma’s: When you go to Axechange and see the five most popular presets, you’re seeing what you can hear on fifty thousand SoundClouds. The most popular 6505/Mesa presets don’t always sit well in a mix with the most popular Steven Slate libraries, but it surely sounds good to all the guys bouncing and exporting at 128kps, otherwise why would they insist?

    I’ve seen ten thousand views logged on a YouTube video of a guy covering a YouTube cover, and twenty thousand on a reupload of the first cover. This is Making It. And you’re considered especially savvy to film yourself doing this with one particular brand of guitar, and another of the same brand (but in an eye-catching color) hanging on the wall in-frame. This and subscribers totaling more than four digits can constitute your eligibility for endorsement, provided your appearance is relatable to what the brand considers their core Youtube audience to be. Sorry, 40+ year-old man with lesson channel - You’re unskilled enough for us, but you don’t have the right kind of tits.

    Typing these phenomena out makes me want to list my priciest gear in my sig. You know, for the interested.
     
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  17. oc616

    oc616 Control Deck Wins

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    The last time I listened to a guitarist and thought "this isn't a mildly different version of something I've heard before" was my first experience of Tosin.

    Wes Hauch, Andy James, Jason Richardson et al may have certain studio magic or variance in their skills, but none of them struck as being any more than "a good death metal soloist/a good KSE stand in/a modern interpretation of neo-classical 80's stuff" respectively. Yeah, I can and do enjoy some of their songs and albums, but I'd be lying to myself if I said anything I've seen in the past 6 years or so blew me away by being unique enough.
     
  18. Dayn

    Dayn silly person

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    I'll unironically copy what everyone else has said and say it only seems that way because we can see so many people copying each other these days. It's incredibly easy today to see someone, do something similar, and share what you've done in record time. More people see it, so more people get inspired to do it too. So they do. Many will be lost to time, and the best will stand out. As it always is. We're just more aware of it.

    I'm proud to say I have a unique sound. But I can't say if it's good. Because even copycats have achieved more by actually recording and releasing music, unlike me. So I can't complain or claim any superiority. While I've been picky about my sound, others have actually just gone and done it. I admire that.
     
  19. blacai

    blacai SS.org Regular

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    Nick Johnston. He is just unique.
     
  20. ArtHam

    ArtHam SS.org Regular

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    +1 At any point I could be listening to David Maxim Micic, Intervals, Plini, Modern Day Babylon, Polyphia, Pomegranate Tiger, Jakub Zytecki even. All of them play more or less the same thing and use more or less the same sounds. If I put them all in a playlist they are all interchangeable.
    Nothing new though, happened when Malmsteen came on the scene and when Van Halen got big. It's just that you never really heard about any of the clones safe for the few that were in bands that had good songs.
     

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