First detection of gravitational waves.

Discussion in 'Politics & Current Events' started by BigBaldIan, Feb 11, 2016.

  1. BigBaldIan

    BigBaldIan Bald and gribbly.

    Messages:
    1,577
    Likes Received:
    113
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Location:
    Norwich, UK
  2. VBCheeseGrater

    VBCheeseGrater not quite a shredder

    Messages:
    4,271
    Likes Received:
    406
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Location:
    Hampton Roads
    I saw this on cnn.com this morning - pretty interesting. If it's real, could be first baby step towards some sci-fi like technology I would assume.
     
  3. Rachmaninoff

    Rachmaninoff Amateur porn actor

    Messages:
    1,013
    Likes Received:
    76
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Location:
    Brazil
    So far, the impact it will have is on what we "see" on the universe. Up to these days, everything we saw came from electromagnetic radiation analysis. Now, we have gravitational waves too, which can tell us about bodies with no light, like neutron stars and black holes. Nothing really "sci-fi"...
     
  4. TheKindred

    TheKindred TimeTravel Innovator

    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    83
    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    The most innocuous of discoveries have led to some of the biggest cultural and technological changes for humanity.

    We're on the cusp of looking into an abyss of reality that previously only gave up about 4% of it's secrets (if even that; we don't know what we don't know, ya know?). I think unlocking the 'next level' of the universe will most likely lead to some fracking crazy SciFi developments (while hopefully sidestepping the pitfalls of SyFy developments).

    Just seems a bit ignorant to be like "meh, no biggie" to something that revolutionary.
     
  5. Rev2010

    Rev2010 Contributor

    Messages:
    5,583
    Likes Received:
    652
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    I think his point was more in regard to the comment about sci-fi like technology. Einstein predicted Gravity Waves, and has been right with pretty much everything so far, that we knew they existed and technology and intellect just needed to catch up to be able to confirm they are real and there. We still barely understand the full nature of gravity other than to say (and calculate it's affects) matter creates a curvature in space/time toward which matter falls, light's path also is affected due to the curvature, and time slows down (more so as the mass is larger). But the exact fabric/nature of spacetime is unknown and we've only just confirmed gravitational waves. It probably still needs to be peer reviewed to eliminate any chance of error - though I doubt there is. The point was just that the confirmation is so new and so far it just says the theory is correct. Thinking that it's going to suddenly lead to new "sci-fi" science inventions I'd agree is pretty unlikely. Of course though, it still is awesome and extremely significant. Definitely could be up there for a Nobel.


    Rev.
     
  6. TheKindred

    TheKindred TimeTravel Innovator

    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    83
    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    My point wasn't it being anything sudden. I doubt that the first discoveries (or confirmations) of magnetism led anyone to believe how we would end up manipulating electromagnetism to magnificent ends. I was saying that it's way too early to anticipate what we will do with that knowledge and what kinds of things will come out of it. Humanity has a pretty piss poor track record of recognizing how big a discovery really is until someone uses it in the next big tech or changes existing tech significantly.

    Not the best example, but when we were able to confirm quantum particles (which were predicted prior), something like Quantum computing wasn't the first thought. That didn't happen until we started digging into it and new possibilities based on it started to reveal themselves.

    Sure all we did was confirm a prediction for now, but to say it won't lead to anything "sci-fi", still seems a little shortsighted. Maybe we have different definitions of sci-fi. If we didn't "discover"/harness fire, we probably wouldn't have smartphones, but I doubt that's what Caveman Ogg was thinking whilst sitting by that apocryphal campfire.

    Everything else aside, it's still pretty amazing!
     

Share This Page