Fanned frets ? (Volume on bass v treble side)

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by Discoqueen, Jan 1, 2018.

  1. Discoqueen

    Discoqueen Dang tootin

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    hey y'all

    I've been reading through some threads on fanned frets but can't seem to get the exact information I'm looking for-- most likely cuz I'm just not comprehending the information as it isn't articulated in a way that resonates with me yet.

    So, I have an RG8 (27" scale in case somehow a member of this forum doesn't know :eek:).

    With fanned frets I'm trying to figure out what the differing scales do for the tone of the guitar. I understand that the highs will not be so bright because the 27" scale on the treble sight would lose an inch or so, thus relaxing the tension a bit, but I am curious about volume.

    I like how snappy and "sharp" my treble strings sound on my RG8: because I like playing with my fingers equally as much with a pick I find that snappiness compliments my playing style. But, the volume on the treble side seems more substantial because of this.

    Do fanned frets effect this sort of thing? Or would thicker strings on the bass side help this? I can't remember what gauge my B and F# are, but they are probs on the lighter side.) Or could this be also partly a pick-up issue?

    Thank you :)
     
  2. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    It doesn't really affect the volume, per se. But, a floppy bass string, or a super thin high string will be quieter. But that's not a direct result of the fan - just tuning. In other words, I don't tune up to A4 at 27" anymore, because the string necessary makes it sound suuuuuper quiet. But, at the normal E, everything is totally the same. So, basically, the fan makes no volume difference.
     
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  3. Discoqueen

    Discoqueen Dang tootin

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    Okay! Thank you, Hollowway
     
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  4. DudeManBrother

    DudeManBrother Blames it on "the rain"

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    If you want to effect the volume you can play with the pickup height. Having the bass side lower than the treble can make the treble a bit punchier. Fan shouldn't factor in much. Ideally you get the fan so you can have the lower tunings without having to resort to giant strings, which is a plus
     
  5. Discoqueen

    Discoqueen Dang tootin

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    Yeah ha, I've got my work cut out for me with my RG8. I bought it used and haven't even changed the strings yet.

    I was really also trying to gauge whether fan frets are something that could be useful to me, since they are much more accessible now. I guess I was missing the point because like Hollowway said if the tension is way off the string won't produce enough sound.

    And thanks! I'll start playing with the pickup height tomorrow!
     
  6. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Adding/Subtracting 1-3" should have no noticeable effect on volume. It will greatly affect tone, though. Longer scale = brighter tone, generally speaking. Typically, having a brighter tone on bass strings and a darker tone on treble strings makes a clearer, more articulate sound without too much harshness on the plain strings.
     
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  7. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks SS.org Regular

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    multi scales are good for everybody!
     
  8. A-Branger

    A-Branger SS.org Regular

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    yup, but it can also be used for standard tunnings, either by dropping a gauge to have a better tone, or by staying the same and enjoying the new added tension, which also adds to a better tone
     
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  9. Discoqueen

    Discoqueen Dang tootin

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    Ah thanks y'all that makes much more sense I think my brain is finally processing this.

    So I guess I need to get thicker strings for my RG8 for instance, like, because the f# is so much quieter than even the low e string.

    I was asking about the fanned frets because I wanted to know if they could facilitate a more even sound across the fretboard, but it seems my problem is the size of the strings or my set up is the issue and would be even if I had fanned frets.

    I was also curious because I'll be looking for a new 8 in a little while so the info is ver y helpful :)
     
  10. DudeManBrother

    DudeManBrother Blames it on "the rain"

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    Exactly. I didn’t do a great job of explaining that. I wrote “lower tunings” but was trying to refer to the lower register in general, or lower strings, regardless of if the strings are tuned to standard or below. Having a comfortable 25.5”ish scale length for the strings that get bent the most while being able to have nice tension on the lower strings without needing bass strings. Trying to solo comfortably on 28.625” scales, even with a .009 sucks. Tuning to F# on a 25.5” would come with all sorts of compromises. Hence the fan. Best of both worlds
     
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