Ergonomic A-frame / leg rest for electric guitar: 'Performaxe'

Discussion in 'Gear & Equipment' started by ixlramp, Sep 30, 2017.

  1. ixlramp

    ixlramp SS.org Regular

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    http://www.guitarscientist.com/electric-guitar-leg-rest/
    I recently spent some time searching for something to attach to a mainstream guitar to improve ergonomics while sitting, didn't find much except a narrow 'NeckUp' derived from the acoustic guitar suction-cup version.
    Seemed to me something that clamps firmly onto thte body is ideal for electric guitar, a suction-cup attachment is of course better for a hollow acoustic guitar that you wouldn't want to clamp.

    I just found the 'Performaxe' which is a dedicated design being prototyped.

    Recently i am noticing the bad posture of players using a superstrat in classical position, you see it everywhere on the internet, i cannot unsee it now:
    Right leg down and to the right to get it out of the way of the convex rounded body (the worst possible shape for resting on the leg).
    Upper torso twisted to the left because the guitar is so far to the left.
    Neck twisted further to the left to look at the fretboard.

    It is obvious that players love to play sitting down, and most metal / ERG players play in classical position. However the superstrat design is a hopelessly bad design for this.
    No surprise, almost all mainstream guitars have designs taken from the 50s, 60s or 70s (and unfortunately NOT the 80s, as in Steinberger / headless, because that is not retro-fashionable) with little consideration of ergonomics or balance while playing sitting or standing.
    Ironically it was the 80s that was a brief period of hope and progression that then disappeared in the 90s as retro rock became fashionable again. Since then, 30 years ago, guitar design has regressed in some ways.

    To fix this posture the upper torso needs to rotate to centre and the right leg needs to be level with the other leg, the guitar body needs to be reshaped and cut around the player's body, with a super long lower horn resting on the left leg.
     
  2. kindsage

    kindsage SS.org Regular

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    This sounds oddly like an advertisement
     
  3. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks SS.org Regular

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    this looks pretty cool. i play strandberg tho.
     
  4. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire baritone6/8 string hoarder

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    In my experience superstrats play just fine in the classical position (left foot elevated, straight back/wrist). Most ergonomic problems seem to stem from people resting their guitars on their right leg ie the non-classical position. Some guitar designs like flying Vs are just terrible for anything other than standing, so the stand actually seems useful for those. Otherwise I don't think it's that useful.
     
  5. ixlramp

    ixlramp SS.org Regular

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    Not much of an advertisement, only 2 lines refer to the product and although i consider a clamped device a good idea i do not directly admire the product itself. The rest is a tangent about my genuine feelings about guitar design.

    I'm sure it seems fine before trying something much better. I can see that a huge number of players play superstrats this way and i expect most of them think it's fine, so i expect to be told by many it's fine.

    'Left foot elevated' is bad ergonomics, during researching leg rests i read about how raising a leg or using a footstool, can lead to injury, the legs should ideally be level.
    Almost all the photos and videos i see do not show a straight back, the shoulders are twisted to the left, the design obviously encourages bad posture.
    The body needs to have a cutaway for the right thigh, a convex rounded body is the worst shape for supporting against the right thigh, it is inherently unstable.

    I expect many players don't think or care about these issues or don't realise the damage they are causing for the future. This is of course partly why mainstream guitar design is in such a bad way, as most players just want something that 'looks retro rock'n'roll' and has a 60s design, or a slightly modernised version of a 60s design.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2017
  6. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire baritone6/8 string hoarder

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    Pray tell how elevating the foot leads to injury. I hope you have some legitimate medical study to back that rather than conjecture/anecdotal evidence. Besides that classical guitar posture was developed to work with convex rounded bodies since that's how the original spanish guitars were made. I I won't deny that there are more stable or better suited designs for ergonomics but the guitar itself is less the issue and more how people position themselves improperly/have consistent poor posture. Some designs do mitigate those bad habits/ improve the overall ergonomics but there's only so much that can be done with the shape of the guitar/position of the guitar alone.
     
  7. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks SS.org Regular

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    seeing how not every classical guitarist is a crippled mess...and they usually have much better posture then electric players. I don't see how using a footrest can be a problem at all.
     
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  8. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire baritone6/8 string hoarder

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    exactly my point. I want evidence of how elevating the foot is bad. The only instance I can think of is for obese/elderly patients that have poor blood flow and would be at higher risk for deep vein thrombosis/strokes due to clots and that's just a general problem with those patients sitting too much.
     
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  9. Unleash The Fury

    Unleash The Fury SS.org Regular

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    Looks like a good idea but the device looks like it could get painful/discomforting after not too long. Especially with a neck-heavy guitar it seems like it would start digging into your thigh
     
  10. LeviathanKiller

    LeviathanKiller Knee-shooting Archer

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    In that shadow over there -->
    5 years after this becomes the standard someone comes out with something along the lines of:
    "Have you experienced poor circulation in your thighs due to the bowed out shape of your guitar? We have revolutionized the industry now with a guitar that has double cutaways instead of one!"
     
  11. Unleash The Fury

    Unleash The Fury SS.org Regular

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    Either that or, if youve suffered serious injury due to this device, call the law offices of..........
     
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  12. rockskate4x

    rockskate4x rockskate4x

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    Looks pretty cool. I've been thinking of building something like this so that I can give any of my guitars a bottom contour similar to those of the klein guitars and klein copies. They look really comfortable (if not a little bit silly). I for one have felt discomfort from extended periods of sitting with a footrest. I may just be doing it wrong, but I think it puts a twist in the base of the spine and causes hip and lower back pain. The added elevation to the guitar neck has been worth it for my fretting hand, but if I can sit with my legs even and have the support above the leg, I feel like I can have all the benefits of classical position and none of the pain.
     

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