EQing 5 string bass with 8 string guitar

Discussion in 'Bass Guitar Discussion' started by Trex, Jan 16, 2017.

  1. Trex

    Trex SS.org Regular

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    Hey fellow people of the internet, please note this is only for jamming purposes for now so don't worry getting into shape of room and reverb off walls etc even tho that is a factor but i will deal with it myself. My set up is a 5 string grooveline ibanez bass with volume, pickup blend, high mid and low nobes with active EQ my pedals are a TLC compressor > B3k overdrive > Vintage Deluxe v1 (all powered by a Peder power ISO 5 power supply then the amp im using is a TNT 150 Peavey that has a bit of EQ adjusting ability too. How would you guys EQ and/or adjust these pedals etc so that my bass would fit well with drums and a 8 string in a meshuggah setting for example.
     
  2. A-Branger

    A-Branger SS.org Regular

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    like both playing same octave you mean?

    I would just treat the bass like any other normal setting. Me personally dont like distorsion on a bass, or very little. But the trick with bass is to add mid freq to make it stand out. The "bass" part of it is just to add low end filling, but if you want definition you need to play with the mid and high freq of the instrument/amp.

    The guitar part, try to add even more mid/high-mid freq spectrum, or better said cut down the low end. Naturally you would add a lot of low end to play by yourself in order to sound "full", but having now a bass (and a drum kit), let the bass be the one who fills the low end of the spectrum of your guitar tone. So ideally your guitar by itself would sound thin and some what terrible, but in a band context would be fine.

    Think about a four EQ system for your guitar tone L-LM-HM-H, let the bass take care of the L-LM part of the equation, while concentrat on the HM-H part of the sound........ of course both would overlap (I dont mean "dial 0 on your EQ" kinda thing)

    Both have a different timbre due to the nature of the instrument and amp/FX settings. So both would play along fine (I think), jus tbe sure both are on tune :p as playing same octave would be easier to tell


    mind you I have no real experience in a 8 string guitar setting, but thats how I would approach it
     
  3. LordIronSpatula

    LordIronSpatula Indeed.

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    Beto makes some good points. :yesway:

    When I was studying recording studio techniques, our professors talked a lot about "subtractive equalization." Basically, the principle is that you focus on the most distinctive part of each instrument's tone, and dial back the other elements a bit. The reason it's called "subtractive equalization" is because cutting less important frequencies is favored over boosting important ones. In application, you can certainly do both, but cutting usually sounds more natural than boosting. In your particular situation, you'd probably want to focus on the respective midranges of the bass and guitar, and leave the extreme highs and lows of the mix for the kick drum and cymbals.

    A lot of times a tone that sounds great solo will contain to much sonic information to sit well in the context of a mix, and will actually only serve to muddy everything up. You want to really focus on what will punch through the most, which as Beto mentioned might make things sound a little weird when solo'd.

    By the way the Grooveline series are great basses! In passive mode, they have a great jazz bass tone with very colorful midrange. It's a shame they didn't catch on. :noplease:
     
  4. A-Branger

    A-Branger SS.org Regular

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    I think the price was one of the reasons $$$$$$$$
     
  5. ryane24

    ryane24 SS.org Regular

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    I don't want to intrude on the original question, but I have a question that may fit with this rather than starting a new thread. How do you all go about matching the octave of an 8-string? Do you actually tune the low B to F#? Octave pedal?
     
  6. LordIronSpatula

    LordIronSpatula Indeed.

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    If you need your tunings to match in the interest of doubling the guitar part the most common solutions are:

    A) Get thick ass strings (usually Kaliums) and file out your nut slots so you can tune to an octave below the 8 string. And if possible, use a extended/multiscale bass like a Dingwall, LTD B-1005SE or one of the Rondo offerings.

    B) Tune up and play in the same octave as the guitar like Meshuggah usually does. On a five string bass, you usually match the E string to the lowest note on the guitar and have an additional lower string.

    If you don't need your tuning to facilitate playing the same thing as the guitar, you can use any tuning you like.

    Hope that answers your question. :metal:
     
  7. Baelzebeard

    Baelzebeard Grinder of strings

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    Lots of good advise above, so I'll just stick to equipment.

    As a long time owner of a peavey tnt160 (had mine since about '94) you can definitely do better. They sound fine at low to medium volume, but in my experience doesnt really have the power or projection to keep up with a drummer and/or loud guitar rig. Also, mine doesn't seem to handle tuning below drop D or so. Just isn't built for that, especially at high volume. My TNT is loaned out to a friend for practicing his Rhodes piano because it just couldn't cut it in a band setting (for loud metal).

    My advice would be to track down a used 4x10, and decent 400+ watt head.

    Don't let it stop you from playing, use whatever you have to keep creating/practicing.
     

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