Decent Jigsaws/Bandsaws for cutting bodies and necks that won't break the bank (AU)

Discussion in 'Luthiery, Modifications & Customizations' started by Well Above Hell, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. Well Above Hell

    Well Above Hell Archon Audio

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD, AU
    As the title describes. I know next to nothing about power tools and am just starting to get things together for my first build. I've used bandsaws and jigsaws before, but as for the spec requirements for building guitars, I'm completely lost. I've had some help from my good friend @dankarghh about a number of things so far (including routers, which I just went out and bought yesterday!).

    I've been looking at these, but I'm not sure whether or not they are suitable:

    https://www.bunnings.com.au/ozito-810w-pendulum-jigsaw_p0048823

    https://www.bunnings.com.au/makita-650w-d-handle-corded-jigsaw_p0204848

    https://www.bunnings.com.au/ozito-200mm-250w-bandsaw_p0035836

    https://www.bunnings.com.au/ryobi-350w-230mm-bandsaw_p6210455

    Point me in the right direction?

    P.S. Any 1/4" router bit recommendations would be awesome!
     
  2. MikeNeal

    MikeNeal SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    599
    Likes Received:
    371
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018
  3. Well Above Hell

    Well Above Hell Archon Audio

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD, AU
    Thanks for the recommendation @MikeNeal! I've heard great things about the Carbatec stuff! Unfortunately, it's definitely out of my price range though. I don't want to invest a tonne until I know that I'm going to get addicted and want to build a lot more instruments. I more or less just need something that will get the job done at the moment.
     
  4. Soya

    Soya Poor person Contributor

    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    416
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2014
    Location:
    Illinois
    Honestly I just use a Porter Cable cordless jigsaw to rough out bodies. Only $50 online ( well in the US) and enough power to cut through 2" of body blank.

    Oh and as far as router bits, I've had good luck with Yonaco bits off Amazon, or CMT if I need a better finish on the cut.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018
    Well Above Hell likes this.
  5. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire despair ahead

    Messages:
    9,085
    Likes Received:
    6,126
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2015
    Location:
    minnesotahhh
    ^ this is what I do as well. A scrollsaw is also a viable option ime. A bandsaw is great, but you don't really need one unless you plan to cut your own billets for bookmatching imo. If you stick with building then by all means buy a bandsaw, but you can get by just fine with minimal tools.
     
    Well Above Hell likes this.
  6. MikeNeal

    MikeNeal SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    599
    Likes Received:
    371
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    In that case I would skip the small bandsaws and get a decent jig saw. On my early builds I used a cordless dewalt jigsaw with great results
     
    Well Above Hell likes this.
  7. Well Above Hell

    Well Above Hell Archon Audio

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD, AU
    Minimal tools are definitely the go for the moment. @MikeNeal A jigsaw it is! Are there any specific wattages I should be looking for? Does that make a difference? How about blade type?

    Thanks @Soya for the router bit recommendations!
     
    Soya likes this.
  8. MikeNeal

    MikeNeal SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    599
    Likes Received:
    371
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    Not sure about wattage. For blades I just got a longer wood blade that would cut through the width of my body blank
     
    Well Above Hell likes this.
  9. Well Above Hell

    Well Above Hell Archon Audio

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD, AU
    Sweet as, thanks for the help so far!
     
  10. Soya

    Soya Poor person Contributor

    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    416
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2014
    Location:
    Illinois
    Just realized I meant Yonico, not Yonaco.
     
    Well Above Hell likes this.
  11. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD Bass Player in Exile

    Messages:
    1,655
    Likes Received:
    283
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Location:
    Norman, OK
    I have a 10" (250mm) Craftsman bandsaw I got from Sears for $180 US. I've had it about 5 years and have used it on almost everything I've built.

    It's not, of course, made by craftsman. It's made by some chinese company and branded craftsman, and it look exactly like the Ryobi. That's what I would go with, if that's your budget.

    The only thing I can't do with it is resaw figured tops. But I can do that with my table saw, so it works out fine.

    It's definitely better to have a bigger saw, but sometimes that just isn't in the cards, and you have to work with what you can get.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
    Well Above Hell likes this.
  12. Well Above Hell

    Well Above Hell Archon Audio

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD, AU
    Thanks for your input @HaMMerHeD! I'm very torn between a decent jigsaw or a cheap band-saw at this point. Just need to make up my mind!
     
  13. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD Bass Player in Exile

    Messages:
    1,655
    Likes Received:
    283
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Location:
    Norman, OK
    Well....I know there will be people who disagree, but I think a jigsaw is not the right tool for that particular job. It can be done, but a $300 bandsaw will do that job better and quicker than a $300 jigsaw.

    Jigsaw's, of course, are physically capable of cutting 8/4 slabs of hardwood, but they aren't designed for it. They are mostly designed for cutting sheet goods, and that's where they excel.

    Bandsaw's are easier to control and require less cleanup afterward.

    IMO and YMMV of course.
     
  14. MikeNeal

    MikeNeal SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    599
    Likes Received:
    371
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    Then again if you are cutting up 8/4 slabs of hardwood, you should invest in a good bandsaw. A cheap 9 or 10" band saw may give you problems as well ripping some hardwoods.

    I still vote for saving up and getting something with atleast 1 hp
     
  15. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD Bass Player in Exile

    Messages:
    1,655
    Likes Received:
    283
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Location:
    Norman, OK
    I see this argument all the time, and the fact that I have been building basses for the last 5 years with a 10" bandsaw with a 1/3hp motor seems to disagree with the point. I cut my 8/4 body blanks and resaw fingerboard blanks with it all the tine. And the saw still works. Maybe it goes through blades a little quicker than a larger saw, but the blades are cheaper too, so...meh.

    Obviously we should all get the best tools we can afford, but for some people, that simply excludes a larger bandsaw.
     
  16. MikeNeal

    MikeNeal SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    599
    Likes Received:
    371
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto, ON

    i agree that we should get the best tools we can afford. the used market can be hot too. i bought my 14" craftsman band saw for 100 dollars canadian. sometimes awesome deals can fall in your lap
     
  17. Well Above Hell

    Well Above Hell Archon Audio

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD, AU
    I've been on the lookout for a decent second-hand bandsaw since before I made this post, but still no luck. Hopefully something pops up! I'll report back once I have my chosen tool in hand. Thanks so much for the insight so far dudes; I really appreciate it!
     

Share This Page