Bjj warriors I need your wisdom

Discussion in 'Lifestyle, Health, Fitness & Food' started by Nyx Erebos, May 22, 2016.

  1. Nyx Erebos

    Nyx Erebos SS.org Regular

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    I'm more a kick boxing kind of guy but recently I started training with some friends in bjj. And while my defensive skills are improving, I have a hard time on the offensive part. In kick boxing I can watch a technique and then practice it until I get the hang of it but in bjj it feels like setting up the right situation to use a technique is much harder. I think that it would be better for me to learn the levers of the human body I can use. So if you can share how to grab and twist some limbs or even better if you have link to a video, I'd be able to kick some azz.
     
  2. 13la13la

    13la13la Amateur Idiot Contributor

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    In order to utilise BJJ you have to actually use BJJ techniques. As far as I understand it seem you are still using the kickboxing basis.
    Immerse yourself with BJJ and kind of "Let go" the Kick boxing element.

    A good way to understand levers and mechanics of the human body is immersion. I would slowly go over techniques with your friends. When you are improving your ground game go over the technique slowly until you understand how it works and then go from there.

    Good luck, it's fun and a super efficient style!
     
  3. kootenay

    kootenay SS.org Regular

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    I am about 8 months into my BJJ journey and about 1 year into kick boxing so I have a little exp in both. I can say that in kick boxing I feel far more accomplished than in BJJ thus far, and not just 4 months worth. Early on in BJJ you just have to accept that you are going to be on the defensive for a long time, learning how it feels to roll, etc. I think I have only landed 3 submissions thus far and we roll after every class and there is an open mat day. You need to count the small things as win early on, such as not getting choked in 30 seconds, remembering a technique from a week ago, and my personal favourite actually getting a sweep. I went from getting mauled in under 30 seconds to now giving people higher rank than me all sorts of issues when trying to submit me. The steps are small and there are many, enjoy the journey.
     
  4. Nyx Erebos

    Nyx Erebos SS.org Regular

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    It's just that the techniques can be only used in very particular situations. That's why I'd prefer to understand how the body works. I guess I'm looking for the most basic techniques for when I'm at the bottom, on full mount, etc...
     
  5. USMarine75

    USMarine75 Doc McStuffins Contributor

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    What worked for me... The easiest thing I found is just to roll at about 10% speed. My offensive style is to keep my hands (and feet) retracted and then wait for the opponent to reach in. That automatically sets up what technique I will use. I'll paw and incite the opponent, but in the end I wait for him to give me something to twist, lock, break, manipulate, etc.

    So what I'm saying is you'll grab and see what technique you can apply... if you mess up, no worries, you're only going at 10%. Give the joint/limb back and try again. A good partner is probably the most important part of this. He needs to let you follow through with moves and critique you (e.g. he knows whether that move would have worked, proper pressure, locked out, etc...).

    The key is just repetition and experience... NOTHING will replace that.

    Anywho, have fun and most of all enjoy!
     
  6. motomoto

    motomoto SS.org Regular

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    You are not seing the big picture yet.
    Check out this video. The guy uses only the kimura and americana in loads of different situations.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2016
  7. Ebart

    Ebart SS.org Regular

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    PATIENCE. Seriously. Expect to be mostly in survival mode for around the first year of training. Do not let this deter you. There will be days when you submit guys - hey, I've been training almost 10 years and I let the new guys submit me all the time...gotta help em build that confidence. But it is a looooong journey. Just be patient and keep training man. Stick with it and it'll come.
     
  8. Nyx Erebos

    Nyx Erebos SS.org Regular

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    That's actually what I want to know. How to twist and lock efficiently. When I try random stuff it's not enough for them to feel threatened.

    @motomoto yes the guys I train with taught me the basics of the kimura but as the video demonstrates very well, there are as many variations as there different situations.

    The kind of knowledge I'm looking for is more along the lines of "if you twist the arm in this direction it hurts" or "if you push there they will lose balance".
     
  9. 13la13la

    13la13la Amateur Idiot Contributor

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    Spar more, in martial arts it is actually not recommended to do the "oh I saw this on tv let me try this move". It is why you spar and not try kill each other at let's say 110%.

    How are your training partners? Do they give you pointers and or encourage you? These are all vital things.
    When I was in the I am not sure what I am doing at all phase the thing that helped the most was: Me vs. 1 other person while someone else slowly talks you through your options. Sure it sounds very weird, but if you are in the thick of it your decision-making is terrible (I am talking from experience).

    After all that: repetition, repetition, some more repetition, switch sparring partners, try different stuff, did I mention repetition?

    Good luck, tell me how it works!
     
  10. Nyx Erebos

    Nyx Erebos SS.org Regular

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    Yes that is actually what we do. Either they show me a technique or a flaw and they lightly defend/attack so that I can practice the point in question. But then in a "real" spar I just can't seem to use what I learn.

    And for me seeing a move on video helps me a lot to learn it (at least in kickboxing).
     
  11. USMarine75

    USMarine75 Doc McStuffins Contributor

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    More repetitions. It's like teaching someone how to catch a football and then throwing them in a game. There is no magic formula... Just more repetitions.

    But I will say this... some moves just work better for some people. I can get a guillotine on just about anyone from just about any starting position (and if they give up their back then it turns into a rear naked or cross face depending on what I'm trying to accomplish). I can also do a standing armbar takedown on just about anyone, even though it's generally considered one of the most useless moves in real life. But these moves come naturally to me and I've had countless reps from all different vantage points. Other moves just don't work for me at all, no matter how many reps I seem to get. But I only know what works for me and what doesn't from countless hours of practice at less than 100%, as well as then doing fight-for-your-life / 100% / full on sparring (and a few brawls ;)).
     
  12. Fathand

    Fathand Tube Snake Boogie

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    I can relate to that (especially the highlighted part), and actually that gave me some hope in my own progress. So thanks. :)

    I'm halfway of that 8 months and I can say that I'm just now learning that you really need to slow things down to figure out what you're doing, what the opponent is doing and how things interact in rolling. Luckily there is a lot of that during practice, and that is the best practice. In our gym the higher belts give out tips during rolling how to escape and how to see openings etc. There is no replacement for that - you can hone the techniques (which in general are a lot more intricate that you would think, so a good instructor is basically must), but to apply them you have to try to use them to see what works and what doesn't in every given situation.

    So in short: rolling, rolling, rolling and more rolling
     

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