1 hour per day, particular focus on technique, suggest me how to manage it

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by ktulhu, May 10, 2017.

  1. ktulhu

    ktulhu SS.org Regular

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    i'd like to dedicate 15-20 minutes of the section to learning songs (death and thrash mainly) but i'd like to push particularly towards pure technique development (legato, scales, alternate, downpicking etc) has anyone got suggestions on how to divide the time, links to exercises and stuff? any help is appreciated.
     
  2. Mr. Big Noodles

    Mr. Big Noodles Theory God

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    The important thing is to be very focused and goal-oriented. Reasonable goals too. "I'm going to learn these four measures." "I'm going to learn this section." I like to learn music backwards so that I don't get stuck at the beginning. With each practice session, play the stuff that you learned before, but spend more time on the stuff you are learning for that day.
     
  3. domsch1988

    domsch1988 SS.org Regular

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    I did something like this:
    Whenever i picked up the guitar:
    - 1 minute downpicking without rest at one tempo. Got through it? increase by 10 BPM until i failed.
    - Downpicking with string skipping: played "Frostbite" twice in a row at one tempo. Made it? increase by 10 BPM until failed.
    - three note per string licks: Same as above, without regarding a scale play up and down at a certain tempo. Works? Increase by 10 BPM.
    - Arpeggio: Look up one arpeggio to learn. Then, rinse and repeat, Up the Tempo by 10BPM until failing.

    The whole thing took less than 20 minutes after having a good idea which tempi i can handle. This is highly dependent on what your goals are though.
     
  4. kindsage

    kindsage SS.org Regular

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    The Guitar Grimoire Exercise book (the green one) is great in my opinion.

    Its basically a speed and dexterity exercise book. Almost no theory. Tons of exercises involving alternate picking, economy picking, string skipping, etc. Best part is they force you to use almost the entire neck of the guitar. Use a metronome and I believe you'll have enough in that book to keep you busy for life.

    Not really anything on sweeps though. I would use songs by The Human Abstract as practice material for sweeping.

    As for down picking, just start learning death and thrash songs.
     
  5. bpprox22

    bpprox22 String Breaker

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    Dude, I just want to say I appreciate all your posts :kiss:
     
  6. ktulhu

    ktulhu SS.org Regular

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    i appreciate all your suggestions, but i'm looking more for suggestions on the material and way to practice than mindset (i'm already tuned with first reply suggestion) the 1 minute theory it's interesting, as the suggestion for the book. how much time per section do you spend over a single exercise? and how often do you change a specific exercise in your routine? is it more a time target (every session for 1 month) or a goal thing (i'll switch to another once reached 30bpms faster than the starting day)? again thank you all.
     
  7. shaunduane

    shaunduane SS.org Regular

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    I highly suggest Riff Training by Jonathan Strange. It breaks down how to practice kind fo like a workout with sets & reps, what tempo to play at and when to increase it, and how to do what exercises he gives you. It's an incredible book, and only $20 for the PDF on his website.

    https://www.shredtraining.com/products/riff-training-level-1-pdf
     
  8. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    I don't think any particular program is the way to go - rather, identify things in your playing that you struggle with, figure out what the exact mechanics are that are giving you trouble, and figure out a drill to practive just that. Once you've made progress and eliminated that area of weakness, find another weakness, figure out the root cause, and start practicing that.
     
  9. Element0s

    Element0s Low Fantasy/Black Denim

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    I generally set a timer for 10/15/20 mins (depending on how much time I have in the day or how much I'm prioritizing that technique) and run whatever I'm working on until the timer is up, then I move on to the next thing. I've found that I can't trust myself to just work on something until I'm satisfied as I'll usually end up mindlessly slamming myself into something for way too long. Shorter, focuses bursts of time on a single concept are my jam.

    I might do something like this in a normal day of practice:

    15 mins string bending (w/metronome)
    15 mins vibrato
    15 mins legato (generally working on one lick or pattern in this time and just focusing on getting the technique as perfect as possible)
    15 mins picking

    I'll do these with metronome.

    then....
    30+ mins of licks/improv practice (playing a riff while tapping my foot and inserting licks where appropriate, trying to keep the tempo going with my foot and repeating the lick a bunch of times until I feel like I've exhausted the lick. I'll try to practice this standing up if I can)

    If I'm still feeling it, I'll throw on a couple backing tracks and do some improv.

    Depending on what I'm working on and what I'm prepping for this structure will change but this is a pretty good skeleton of how I approach a routine. I got most of my exercises from Paul Gilbert.
     
  10. inaudio

    inaudio Hack Fraud

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    This reminds me of a mantra I heard from Rick Beato - don't practice things you already know. It's a good thing to turn into a habit even when you're just noodling around. These days when I notice that I'm playing things that I've already practiced, I remember that quote and try to figure out how to play some new arpeggio on the spot. Over the last week I've come up with three new arpeggios that are now in my arsenal and I've also noticed that as a result I'm more aware of intervals around the fretboard. I find the mantra so effective that I wrote it on a post-it note and stuck it on my fridge.

    I think that it's important to have a good routine regarding the mechanics of your playing just like Element0s laid out. On top of that I think that it would be beneficial to allocate some time for trying to figure out something completely new on the fretboard. The feeling of expanding your musical vocabulary and learning new things is insanely addictive.
     

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