homepage   sevenstring guitars   sevenstring registry   subscription   spy 
Sevenstring.org - The Seven String Guitar Authority
Go Back   SevenString.org > Music Discussion > Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques
LIKE SS.org on Facebook FOLLOW SS.org on Twitter


Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques Discussions on Theory, member submitted lessons, practice regimens and everything else.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-10-2012, 05:38 PM   #1
angelophile
ss.org Regular
 
angelophile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: leeds uk
Posts: 121
Thanked: 5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Another practice schedule thread?

Didn't see any current threads on practice routines/materials.

Maybe a boring topic but important.

I manage 20 hrs per week these days, want to get some more breadth/variety.

most of my practice is alternate picking work.

(I max at 16ths 170bpm, most stuff I can play at 16ths 155bpm)

Maybe we could get a contest going of who can practice the most hours in a week ??!!


angelophile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2012, 09:17 PM   #2
phrygian12
SS.org Regular
 
phrygian12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: TX
Posts: 210
Thanked: 6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
phrygian12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2012, 06:00 AM   #3
Winspear
EtherealEntity
 
Winspear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Southend-on-Sea, Essex, U.K
Posts: 10,160
Thanked: 105
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
I used to manage 8-12 hrs every day but now it's about 4 on average I expect

I have little imagination. Tending to just run chromatic exercises while reading all the time. I used to learn a lot of songs nice and slow but my guitar is an an open tuning for writing so I can't do that anymore until my custom arrives haha.

I have a huge list of techniques, some normal some very unique, that I'd like to master. But putting them into a workable schedule that I can stick to and creating exercises just hasn't happened yet. I need an entire day to myself to be able to focus on practice like that. When I'm just getting a couple of hours here and there I can't bring myself to do much more than write some riffs or run chromatics haha

Custom ergonomic guitar picks ~ Designed to optimize your technique and tone. Built to last.
http://www.winspearpicks.com
http://www.facebook.com/Winspearpicks
Winspear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2012, 07:00 AM   #4
Maniacal
SS.org Regular
 
Maniacal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Newbury
Posts: 2,191
Thanked: 31
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
What's the prize for doing the most hours?

Books, posters, play along lessons and apps!

I teach on Skype - If you purchased my books, first lesson is free!

http://www.shredtraining.com

Please subscribe to my YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/shredtraining
Maniacal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2012, 02:59 PM   #5
celticelk
Enflamed with prayer
 
celticelk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 4,354
Thanked: 37
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maniacal View Post
What's the prize for doing the most hours?
Repetitive motion injury.

If you bring forth what is within you, what you bring forth will save you.
If you do not bring forth what is within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you.
-The Gospel of Thomas

Do not be afraid of being wrong; just be afraid of being uninteresting.
-T. Carl Whitmer
The Art of Improvisation, 1941

A strong spirit transcends rules.
-Prince

We favor the simple expression of the complex thought.
-Mark Rothko
celticelk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2012, 10:04 PM   #6
Guitarchitect
ss.org Regular
 
Guitarchitect's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: South Pasadena, CA
Posts: 137
Thanked: 12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
One thing to consider, is that it's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that more time always = getting better.

Here's a practice story.

When I was at Berklee there was a sax guy who would talk about how he would practice 8-12 hours a day. Some people at the front desk hipped me to his schedule.

8am - he'd sign out a practice room and lock his sax in it. Then he'd go across the street to Dunkin' and get breakfast.

8:30 - breakfast digested -warm ups and technical drills.

10am - renew the room (to use it as a locker). Go to 2 hour class.

noon - renew the room. Get lunch with friends.

1pm - Shed new tunes, licks, etc

1:45 renew room for 2 hour block

2pm go to class

4pm renew room - shed licks, tunes

5/6pm renew room - get dinner

8pm - play in ensembles until 10 or 12. Go check out a show.

I'm sure he was absolutely convinced that he was putting 12 hours in - but he wasn't - he was putting 4-5 in. Still not shabby - but not 12 hours.

There are multiple questions to ask when thinking about getting things done. For example, How long can you focus on something? How long can you give something your complete and total focus without interruption in a single sitting? It's not 12 hours. or even 8 hours. Or (generally) even 4. It's probably 1-2.

Which isn't bad. Most people can focus intently on something for about a 1/2 hour.

It isn't a question of how much time you put in (unless you want to give yourself focal dystonia like Terry Syrek got) - it's about how much focused, quality time you can put in on something.

(This is why you will get SO MUCH MORE out of six focused 1 hour sessions than one unfocused 6 hour session).

Another question to ask is, what are you going to work on for that time?

Focusing that hard on scales may get you technical facility (only if you're practicing properly), but it won't necessarily make you a better musician.

Here's three suggestions:

1. An article worth reading on this topic: Annie Murphy Paul: The Myth of 'Practice Makes Perfect' | TIME Ideas | TIME.com

2. This is the practice book, I wish I had written.

Amazon.com: The Musician's Way: A Guide to Practice, Performance, and Wellness (9780195343137): Gerald Klickstein: Books

3. I have a number of free practice related links that might help starting with this one.


Definitions and Documents Or Practicing Part IV « Guitarchitecture.org

(These start with basic but important ideas and increase in depth. For technical considerations - you may want to start with part 1 or 2). There are links to all of the practice related posts at the bottom of the page.

I hope that helps!

---------------------
Obligatory plug:

The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Modes: Melodic Patterns, The GuitArchitect’s Positional Exploration, and The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Modes: Harmonic Combinatorics, are now available as bound editions!! Over 1,100 pages of reference and instruction!! Applicable to guitarists and bassists, this series is an invaluable resource for both compositional and improvisational material.”

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/guitarchitecture
Guitarchitect is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 01:27 AM   #7
groovemasta
SS.org Regular
 
groovemasta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: In the pocket
Posts: 565
Thanked: 6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
^ Do you have this guys name? I'd like to check him out if possible.
groovemasta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 02:29 AM   #8
Trespass
AEADGBEA
 
Trespass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 2,783
Thanked: 132
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Sure, you're technically profound, but if I threw you in any real life musical situation (reading lead sheets, reading score, improvising off of a groove, learning albums worth of material by ear to join a touring band etc.) could you do any of that?

Better yet, could you do it without embarrassing yourself?


Seriously. I know tons of metal guys whose time feel is incredibly weak, whether it's blues/jazz/R&B/funk whatever.

The worst part is, they delude themselves into thinking that they can do it, and that they know all these genres. You don't. I don't play Nickelback songs and claim to know metal.

Pseudo-Jazz Sophisticate
-The 7 and ERG Chord Melody [Jazz] Thread-
"If Stravinsky's music is that of the Earth, then Meshuggah's music is that of the Machine"

Teaching
Guitar-Piano Technique/Theory/Jazz & Classical University Prep

Ossington & Bloor area in Toronto.
I now do Sykpe lessons - Inquire via PM!
Trespass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 06:57 AM   #9
Chromis
ss.org Regular
 
Chromis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Kent, England
Posts: 32
Thanked: 3 / 1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
When I first started playing I was averaging eight hours a day, more like 12 on weekends. So I guess around 50-60 unstructured hours per week for about five years; I've since scaled it back to around fifteen hours a week split into various sessions as follows:
  • Two improvisational jams per week of 1-2 hours, with a focus on musicality and coming up with original themes/licks;
  • Two speedwork jams per week of 2-3 hours, predominantly alternate picking as this technique requires the most effort in my opinion. I usually start 16ths at around 170bpm, building up by 5bpm at a time to around 220bpm or as high as I can get on that day;
  • One really long weekend jam, which involves a bit of composition, playing through my songs, and learning new techniques or ideas.

If I'm composing, recording, or producing, some of these sessions might be sacrificed to allow time for this.

I really think that quality of sessions over quantity of sessions is important, especially if you have a busy lifestyle! To be honest though, I'd love to go back to the carefree days of 50-60 hours per week *happy memories*

Whatever your practice schedule, try to push the envelope of your ability once a week, and try to play something completely new once a week, as in my experience 'consistency plus playing at the edge of your abilities' is where the most ground is to be gained.

Hope that is useful. Very interested to hear if other people structure their guitar practice sessions

C.
Chromis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 08:13 AM   #10
Maniacal
SS.org Regular
 
Maniacal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Newbury
Posts: 2,191
Thanked: 31
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Day 1

Alternate picking endurance and speed and metal riffs - 2.5 hours
The first hour or so is spent alternate picking for long periods of time. I will usually get to 200bpm 16ths relaxed and try to sustain this for 5 or 10 minutes.
For the speed part I do burst exercises and metal riffs. I will try to pick faster every day, last time I did 187bpm 16th note triplets for 4 beats. Today I will try to top that by 1 or 2 bpm.
I do lots of riffs with string skipping and odd groupings to get used to playing on an 8 again.
The metal songs I play at the moment are - Babylons Pride by decapitated, Observant by psycroptic, reduced to ashes by deeds of flesh and bleed by meshuggah

Sweep Picking & tapping - 1 Hour
I usually pick keys at random then play the triad, 7th and 9th arpeggios with both sweeping and tapping. Then I will do the same with 7th inversions up the neck. This helps me learn new arpeggio shapes at the same time as working on technique.

Scales - 30 minutes
I will descend all the major, melodic and harmonic modes using 3 and 4 note per string with various sequences. For this I use legato and picking. I am focusing on descending at the moment as I am still in the habit of viewing scales and arpeggios going up.

Improv - 3 15 minute backing tracks
For this improv I just try to tie everything together on the neck. Lets say I am playing over a D Dorian backing track, I will work through all the pentatonics, modes and arpeggios over the entire neck and try not to get stuck. Then I will play the track again and try to switch between techniques like tapping, sweeping, alternate picking etc. The third time I will focus more on playing musically and rhythmically, so I will make a line and then phrase it with different subdivisions and nuances.

Day 2 is jazz, funk, covers and improv. I will go into detail if requested.

Of course I will get slated as a metal shredder or whatever but that just isn't true. But please, feel free to insult my practice.

Books, posters, play along lessons and apps!

I teach on Skype - If you purchased my books, first lesson is free!

http://www.shredtraining.com

Please subscribe to my YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/shredtraining
Maniacal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 08:19 AM   #11
Winspear
EtherealEntity
 
Winspear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Southend-on-Sea, Essex, U.K
Posts: 10,160
Thanked: 105
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
I'm trying to put together a routine like that now.
I'm currently writing a few pages of exercises hybrid picking various intervals in different positions and octaves. Planning to write exercises to cover everything on both my tunings (standard ERG and open tuning). I don't have a normal tuned guitar at the moment, so all I can do aside from writing songs in my open tuning is play exercises rather than learn songs

Custom ergonomic guitar picks ~ Designed to optimize your technique and tone. Built to last.
http://www.winspearpicks.com
http://www.facebook.com/Winspearpicks
Winspear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 08:22 AM   #12
Maniacal
SS.org Regular
 
Maniacal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Newbury
Posts: 2,191
Thanked: 31
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Give me a PM if you want any help

Books, posters, play along lessons and apps!

I teach on Skype - If you purchased my books, first lesson is free!

http://www.shredtraining.com

Please subscribe to my YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/shredtraining
Maniacal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 10:46 AM   #13
MartinMTL
SS.org Regular
 
MartinMTL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 337
Thanked: 0
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I have honestly never understood how people get 50-60 hours per week. If I can get 2 hours of actual metronome-based technique exercises in my day, I am doing very well. That type of practice is just so bland for me. I wish that it wasn't, but I don't want to force myself at the same time. So because of this, my technical abilities on the guitar do kind of suck (relatively). I simply get much more enjoyment out of learning songs/writing my own.
MartinMTL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 12:19 PM   #14
Winspear
EtherealEntity
 
Winspear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Southend-on-Sea, Essex, U.K
Posts: 10,160
Thanked: 105
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinMTL View Post
I have honestly never understood how people get 50-60 hours per week. If I can get 2 hours of actual metronome-based technique exercises in my day, I am doing very well. That type of practice is just so bland for me. I wish that it wasn't, but I don't want to force myself at the same time. So because of this, my technical abilities on the guitar do kind of suck (relatively). I simply get much more enjoyment out of learning songs/writing my own.
Try making exercises from songs that you can't play. For example I learnt the solo for On Impulse when it was way beyond my ability. Took months starting at about 30% speed but it's more fun than chromatic exercises and you have something to play at the end
Done the same with lots of riffs etc.

Custom ergonomic guitar picks ~ Designed to optimize your technique and tone. Built to last.
http://www.winspearpicks.com
http://www.facebook.com/Winspearpicks
Winspear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 12:31 PM   #15
Konfyouzd
Dread-I Master
 
Konfyouzd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mars
Posts: 22,803
Thanked: 213
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
When I practice, I start off by playing stuff that I absolutely KNOW I can play--basically all my go-to licks/runs--for the first 10-15 min. This usually gets me good and warmed up.

After I'm warmed up I sometimes try to just push my speed on the licks/runs I was just playing to see if I can get any more speed/accuracy out of these blunt tools I call hands.

When that gets old I do one of four things:

1. I start looking for patterns between the patterns I see readily just looking down at the board and when I find something that I think sounds cool I try to construct a run out of it by pushing it through the different modes (usually in 5ths). I usually stay fixated on this for a good half hour easily. All the while I try different things like:
a. Playing ONLY that lick all the way through the run.
b. Splicing in other licks partway through the run to keep it from sounding boring.
c. Playing ONLY that lick all the way through, but changing the accents as I go along.
2. Look for new ways to phrase the licks I already know and love.

3. Search Youtube for backing tracks to find context for licks that I really like to use.

4. Grab another guitar in a different tuning and see what I can figure out about it and how it relates to what I would play on any of my other guitars. I do this because I sometimes end up playing with another guitarist that uses another tuning and I find retuning cumbersome, so I try to remember what a lick sounds like with respect to the backing chord instead. I figure as long as we can agree on what a D, E, F, etc is then it doesn't *really* matter if we're tuned differently.



Konfyouzd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 08:20 PM   #16
angelophile
ss.org Regular
 
angelophile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: leeds uk
Posts: 121
Thanked: 5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I'm in awe of people who do 12 hrs a day !

I once managed 9 hours.

when I was at the guitar institute in london they recommended using a digital timer for practice sessions.

I clock up my hours actually spent playing, not just time in the practice room.

Unfortunately I'm becoming nocturnal ! only starting work at 6pm

I'm enjoying working through a jazz real book, and sight reading Kreutzer's 42 violin studies.

I get frustrated trying to get all the alternate picked sequence ideas up to speed.

My target is to reach 200 bpm 16ths by the end of the year, doesn't seem likely though. I can trem pick about 220bpm.

I play my exercises both starting with a down pick and with an up pick.
If I stuck to one approach I would be much quicker.

for an idea of where I'm at, please check "jazzimprovs" @
http://soundcloud.com/danieljpeters

the technical stuff is near the end of the track
angelophile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 12:56 AM   #17
novacekn
ss.org Regular
 
novacekn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 9
Thanked: 0
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
When I was younger I'd practice everyday for 8+ hours with a metronome every single day. Now I don't have a set practice schedule, just jam, improv over some backing tracks, play my favorite licks to keep them sharp, and try to learn songs that are technically over my head, like anything by Jeff Loomis or John Petrucci solos. I'd really like to get a set schedule, don't really know where to start though.
novacekn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 01:12 AM   #18
MartinMTL
SS.org Regular
 
MartinMTL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 337
Thanked: 0
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by EtherealEntity View Post
Try making exercises from songs that you can't play. For example I learnt the solo for On Impulse when it was way beyond my ability. Took months starting at about 30% speed but it's more fun than chromatic exercises and you have something to play at the end
Done the same with lots of riffs etc.
Yeah, thanks for the advice. My other problem is that I get ADD when I practice songs and i always want to try a new one rather than perfect one that I am learning. Really though, I will have to start doing this. Maybe in a few years I will finally be able to get the solo for Cylindrical Sea down

And OP: That improv sounded very good. I really like some of the ideas you had in there.
MartinMTL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 04:40 AM   #19
Chromis
ss.org Regular
 
Chromis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Kent, England
Posts: 32
Thanked: 3 / 1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by novacekn View Post
When I was younger I'd practice everyday for 8+ hours with a metronome every single day. Now I don't have a set practice schedule, just jam, improv over some backing tracks, play my favorite licks to keep them sharp, and try to learn songs that are technically over my head, like anything by Jeff Loomis or John Petrucci solos. I'd really like to get a set schedule, don't really know where to start though.
I reckon that depends on what areas you wish to improve on. Choose the technique or style you've always wanted to master, and start hacking away
Chromis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 06:04 AM   #20
brutalwizard
Pretty Your Petunia
 
brutalwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: idaho
Posts: 2,829
Thanked: 132
Feedback Score: 15 reviews
I was once averaging about 3 hours a day of GOOD consistent routine's

I play about 2 hours a day with maybe thirty minutes of practicing a lick off this video



i am on example 4 and 5 (9:40) doing it at about 260BPM 8th notes

I don't think that we ever thought of it as the equivalent of music, as the end-goal was to buy more in-game slut clothes-- schecterwhore on rock band

Im a super chill mellow ambient slut. --7 STRINGS OF HATE
brutalwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2012, 10:10 AM   #21
mindwalker
SS.org Regular
 
mindwalker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 369
Thanked: 3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I feel like a total n00b here....

1 hour per day... lol. On a good day.. 2 hours...

After working all day in sitting in front of a screen for 8 hours I just lack the motivation to play the guitar for longer than 1 hour...

Guess this is way I can't play 16th note chromatics faster than 160 bpm (and even that is pushing it quite a bit..)
If you're a 32 year old and still no guitar hero better to forget about it! The irony is that now I can afford all the gear I want, but I can't justify doing it
mindwalker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2012, 10:01 AM   #22
Chromis
ss.org Regular
 
Chromis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Kent, England
Posts: 32
Thanked: 3 / 1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
brutalwizard, I LOVE Shawn Lane! How are you getting on with learning his licks?

C.
Chromis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2012, 06:31 PM   #23
phrygian12
SS.org Regular
 
phrygian12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: TX
Posts: 210
Thanked: 6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by brutalwizard View Post
I was once averaging about 3 hours a day of GOOD consistent routine's

I play about 2 hours a day with maybe thirty minutes of practicing a lick off this video



i am on example 4 and 5 (9:40) doing it at about 260BPM 8th notes

That's awesome, but why not practice in various note values?

I mean if you're going to be playing that fast in 8th notes why not use 16th notes and try that at 160? or sextuplets in 115?

I use to practice about an hour or sometimes two hours a day, I need to get back into that. Actually I need to make a practice room that is cut off from the outside world. I seem to get distracted too easily now a days and I feel my mediocre playing is getting worse.
phrygian12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2012, 09:37 PM   #24
InfinityCollision
SS.org Regular
 
InfinityCollision's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 2,136
Thanked: 4
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by mindwalker View Post
I feel like a total n00b here....

1 hour per day... lol. On a good day.. 2 hours...

After working all day in sitting in front of a screen for 8 hours I just lack the motivation to play the guitar for longer than 1 hour...

Guess this is way I can't play 16th note chromatics faster than 160 bpm (and even that is pushing it quite a bit..)
If you're a 32 year old and still no guitar hero better to forget about it! The irony is that now I can afford all the gear I want, but I can't justify doing it
How you practice is infinitely more important than how long you practice. You can improve by leaps and bounds even with only an hour or two a day if you're practicing right.
InfinityCollision is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2012, 05:34 PM   #25
angelophile
ss.org Regular
 
angelophile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: leeds uk
Posts: 121
Thanked: 5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
26 hrs done last week !

feeling the benefits, reached 16ths @180bpm comfortably.

I recommend learning violin studies (Bach, Kreutzer, paganini etc) very good for inner musicality, so easily lost in the slog for technique.

I find myself humming the tunes with my own variations.
angelophile is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 






All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:43 AM.


Our Network: PRS Guitar Forum | Luthier Forum | SG Guitar Forum | Les Paul Forum | Marshall Amp Forum | Acoustic Guitar Forum

SS.org proudly supports St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Copyright © 2004-2016, SevenString.org. All Rights Reserved.