homepage   sevenstring guitars   sevenstring registry   photo gallery   subscription   spy 
Sevenstring.org - The Seven String Guitar Authority
Go Back   SevenString.org > Music Discussion > Luthiery, Modifications & Customizations
LIKE SS.org on Facebook FOLLOW SS.org on Twitter
  
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By anthonyferguson
  • 1 Post By anthonyferguson
  • 1 Post By bob123

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Unread 06-17-2012, 03:53 PM   #1
ss.org Regular
 
noobstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Dorset
Posts: 73
Thanked: 3
noobstix is a jewel in the rough
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Restoring heavy buckle rash and pick scratches

I'm looking at picking up an rga121 which has some pretty bad wear from buckle rash and pick scratches etc but is going for a good price. If I do get the guitar I'm thinking of doing some work to maybe sand out the damage. What are your thoughts on tackling this?
Here is a pic of the worst area:
noobstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Seven String

Beitrag Sponsored Links

__________________
This advertising will not be shown in this way to registered members.
Register your free account today and become a member on SevenString.org
   
Unread 06-17-2012, 04:03 PM   #2
SS.org Regular
 
mniel8195's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Seattle,WA
Posts: 994
Thanked: 7
mniel8195 will become famous soon enough
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
you will have to re sand it. if it was really light you could probably just use car polishing compound or old fashioned toothpaste
mniel8195 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-17-2012, 04:05 PM   #3
 
anthonyferguson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Norf Yorkshire, int pub
Posts: 909
Thanked: 20
anthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of lightanthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of lightanthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of light
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
First thing you need to do is assess how invisible you want the repair to be. This involves finding out what the finish is. From the pic it looks like a regular clear coat sort of thing. When you're happy with what the finish is and you've bought appropriate amounts of it (maybe a good idea to do some tests on scraps of mahogany if you have the means) it looks like those scratches will disappear after an hour or so's sanding. Alternatively you could go the whole hog and use this as an excuse to refinish the thing!! Up to you man! The only issue, as I said, is getting the finish to match. Good luck!
noobstix likes this.

it are go good with pizza
anthonyferguson is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-17-2012, 04:13 PM   #4
ss.org Regular
 
noobstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Dorset
Posts: 73
Thanked: 3
noobstix is a jewel in the rough
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Thanks guys, are there any guides to sanding down a guitar? and what levels of grit should I use?
Also, are there any brands of oil or clear coat that people could recommend?
noobstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-17-2012, 04:22 PM   #5
 
anthonyferguson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Norf Yorkshire, int pub
Posts: 909
Thanked: 20
anthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of lightanthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of lightanthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of light
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Start with 80, go to 120, then 240, and then something like 600 to finish it off is what I usually do. I tend to use Danish oil though, so just double check what sort of grit you need to get down to for a lacquer finish if that's what you're after.
noobstix likes this.

it are go good with pizza
anthonyferguson is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-17-2012, 09:30 PM   #6
SS.org Regular
 
Wretched's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sydney
Posts: 752
Thanked: 39
Wretched is just really niceWretched is just really nice
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Ahh man, leave the back damage... wear it like a badge of honour! Just start adding your own ASAP.
Wretched is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-17-2012, 09:39 PM   #7
Banned
 
bob123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,683
Thanked: 54
bob123 is a splendid one to beholdbob123 is a splendid one to beholdbob123 is a splendid one to beholdbob123 is a splendid one to beholdbob123 is a splendid one to behold
Feedback Score: 6 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by anthonyferguson View Post
Start with 80, go to 120, then 240, and then something like 600 to finish it off is what I usually do. I tend to use Danish oil though, so just double check what sort of grit you need to get down to for a lacquer finish if that's what you're after.
Holy shit do NOT start with 80, 120, OR 240. Start with 400 at the most man. Clear coat restoration, not sanding through the clear!
Metal_Webb likes this.
bob123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-18-2012, 12:48 AM   #8
SS Contributor
 
jordanky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Belfry, KY
Posts: 2,024
Thanked: 53
jordanky is pretty damn metal.jordanky is pretty damn metal.jordanky is pretty damn metal.jordanky is pretty damn metal.jordanky is pretty damn metal.jordanky is pretty damn metal.jordanky is pretty damn metal.jordanky is pretty damn metal.
Feedback Score: 20 reviews
Unless that guitar has been previously refinished or something, there is no clear coat on the back of these guitars, just sealed natural mahogany. I've owned two of these and seen plenty of them otherwise and they have all been the same way.

If you want to get those deep scratches and gouges out, your best bet is either to get some color matching wood dust and work it into a filler with some type of epoxy and sand it all back level, or the quicker and much easier route would be to have a carpenter slightly plane the back of the guitar just enough to knock down the rest of the body to the deepest part of the scratches, then you'd have to re-seal it, roll the body edges again, adjust for the back plate being thicker now that the guitar will be a hair thinner, etc. I would just leave it as is if I were you and the price was right!

Beard Sound Machines Jazzmaster
Beard Sound Machines Jazzcaster
Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Fender AVRI '52 Reissue Telecaster
First Act Custom Shop Delia/Delia LS Hybrid

Vox AC30C2

@beardsoundmachines
lostswimmer.bandcamp.com
jordanky is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-18-2012, 05:38 AM   #9
ss.org Regular
 
noobstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Dorset
Posts: 73
Thanked: 3
noobstix is a jewel in the rough
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Right so if I were to sand this down and tru-oil it...? This is what I'm after - Prestigious NG(+F)D (56k turn back)
noobstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-18-2012, 06:18 AM   #10
SS.org Regular
 
Necromagnon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Grenoble, France
Posts: 1,387
Thanked: 5
Necromagnon is a jewel in the rough
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
If wood is touched, you can bring it back with a humidified cloth posed on the area and then use an iron hot with a lot of vapor. It will rise the grain and get back at least a part of the scratches. After this, you refinish it as always (but you'll have to wait for wood to dry, obviously).
Necromagnon is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-18-2012, 12:31 PM   #11
 
anthonyferguson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Norf Yorkshire, int pub
Posts: 909
Thanked: 20
anthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of lightanthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of lightanthonyferguson is a glorious beacon of light
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Like I said if you're wanting to get rid of the scratches completely you'll need to strip it right back. I can't tell for sure what sort of finish it has on, so you'll have to find out. But depending on what sort of result you're after, those scratches and knocks are deep. Bruising like that won't look good if it's filled up.

it are go good with pizza
anthonyferguson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:35 PM.


Our Network: PRS Guitar Forum | Luthier Forum | SG Guitar Forum | Les Paul Forum | Marshall Amp Forum | Acoustic Guitar Forum

SS.org proudly supports St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Copyright © 2004-2014, SevenString.org. All Rights Reserved.