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Unread 05-08-2012, 04:04 AM   #5
Mr. Big Noodles
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Originally Posted by MrPepperoniNipples View Post
1. First and foremost, is it too early to start teaching?
Not necessarily. I think that if you get started early, you develop a better sense of communicating ideas. The hard part about teaching isn't what you know - it's whether you can break that knowledge down to the point where it is concise and digestible while still being substantial and interesting. Trust me, if you've never communicated your music before, it will be an odd feeling to line up your thoughts.

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- Will people (or parents) take a college freshman as a teacher seriously?
No. You need to earn their respect. Be serious about your job, be driven, but be fun and approachable. Most of all, don't be fake. Your teaching should be a reflection of yourself. Most people that pass through your hands won't learn the extent of your knowledge, so don't attempt to give it all to them. Rather, give them the essence of your thinking. If you have confidence in the material that you teach, then this will prove to be of value.

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2. How does one go about acquiring students, and where should the lessons take place? Should I find a shop that will let me teach there?
Getting students can be tough. I suggest teaching friends or fellow students for a while, just to rehearse your teaching chops. Translating your thoughts into digestible chunks is the trick here, as I've mentioned before. As far as where to teach, I think it depends on your situation. If you have the ability and willingness to teach from your home, a studio, and also drive out to the client, I say you should offer all three. For a while, I only taught out of a studio, as I wouldn't want to bring anybody over to my house and I don't really like to teach at someplace were I have limited access to my resources. Besides, it looks good if you have a place that's set up for the sole purpose of music teaching. If you can land a gig with a shop, that's great, but depending on where you are, it could be difficult to get in without prior experience or a degree.



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